The Modern Class Book of French Pronunciation; Containing All the Rules, with Their Exceptions, Which Govern the Pronunciation of the French Language

The Modern Class Book of French Pronunciation; Containing All the Rules, with Their Exceptions, Which Govern the Pronunciation of the French Language

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1872 edition. Excerpt: ...names only, is a diphthong, --le Puy, Dupuy, &c. 200. When this group of vowels is followed by another vowel in the body of a word, it always forms two diphthongs in connection with that vowel (see pp. 44, 45), except, of course, when y is followed by a silent e. 201. tun is a diphthong only in--202. General Observations.--Initial consonants are Always Sounded in French; and, when several consonants begin a word, they are all pronounced. Even in words beginning with sce, sci, or scy, the s, which is said to be alone sounded, is certainly much strengthened by its association with the c. When two or more words are intimately connected in sense, no solution of continuity in the flow of the voice should occur, and the words must be uttered one after another in one continuous stream, as if they formed but one long word divided into as many syllables as there are vowelsounds in the whole; therefore, when the first word ends with a consonant and the next begins with a vowel, the final consonant of the first word, which otherwise would be silent, is carried to the second word, with which it is fully sounded, becoming, de facto, the initial letter of that word. We have another and more striking illustration of this resumption of sound by consonant letters, in the case of suffixes, or letters added, for whatever object, to some words. For instance, in doigt, grand, vingt, petit, &&, the final t or d is silent; but in doigtier, grandeur, vingtieme, petitesse, &c., it is fully sounded, and begins the syllabla The shortest pause, whether indicated by the punctuation, or not indicated at alL naturally prevents the linking of words together. THEORY. CONSONANTS (continued). General Observations.--The connection does not take place when it might...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236597907
  • 9781236597908