Modern American Lathe Practice; A New Complete and Practical Work on the "King of Machine Shop Tools," the American Lathe. Giving Its Origin and Development. Its Design. Its Various Types as Manufactured by Different Buildersetc

Modern American Lathe Practice; A New Complete and Practical Work on the "King of Machine Shop Tools," the American Lathe. Giving Its Origin and Development. Its Design. Its Various Types as Manufactured by Different Buildersetc

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1907 edition. Excerpt: ...emery wheel, and care taken to heat the tool just so it can be touched with the fingers. "The tool once ground and ready to do the work, the question often arises, 'What lathe, planer, or machine are we going to put it into?' In most cases when a new tool is tried, it is put in a lathe, to do turning; so naturally the superintendent or foreman would pick out the best lathe that was in the shop, i. e., the lathe that was considered to have the most power. "Being now ready to make the test, it is generally tried on steel; that is considered by most superintendents and foremen the severest test to make. Take a piece of steel of almost any diameter, and of the quality most used in the shop, and prepare to take the cut. It seems to puzzle most every foreman to know just what to do and where to start. I speak now of what I have seen, and of the men who are sometimes sent by the steel makers to demonstrate the use of their steels. "I think the proper way is to get at least one dozen shafts of a standard size that are used in the regular line of product, and to first look up the exact time it took to finish or rough off the previous lot; then to determine about what percentage of time would be considered a fair gain to warrant adopting the steel, based on the price per pound of the steel being used. Let it be based at 25 per cent, which I find in most shops can be accomplished, and the lathe be speeded up faster than when the last lot was turned, starting with the same feed and about the same cut, which most any lathe will stand. The superintendent finds, after he has roughed off about two or three pieces, that the tool seems to stand up all right. "The next step is to find out about the speeds and feeds. The first thing is to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 128 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 240g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236596676
  • 9781236596673