The Model Book of Natural History; Comprising Descriptions of Mammals, Birds, Reptiles, Batrachians and Fishes. for Popular Use

The Model Book of Natural History; Comprising Descriptions of Mammals, Birds, Reptiles, Batrachians and Fishes. for Popular Use

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1887 edition. Excerpt: ... squids.." " The frigate-bird, " says Bennett, whom we just quoted, "is.... often seen frequenting the Austral and other tropical islands. It somewhat resembles the cormorant in its general appearance; it is also known by the name of sea-hawk, ... and from its external form and anatomical structure forms a connecting link between the predaceous terrestrial genera and the equally rapacious sea-fowl. In its mode of progression it closely resembles the former.... From the formation of their feet they are incapable of alighting and resting upon the surface of the water, and as they are seen at great distances from the land they must possess an immense power of wing to enable them to sustain such prolonged exertion without repose." While adepts at catching flying-fish, the frigate-birds do not depend upon them as food, but have the trick of robbing gannets as they are returning to their nests, with their stomachs and even their throats full of fish. The frigate-birds dive down upon them, and command them, if not to stand, at least to deliver, and when this is done the vomited mass is caught up by the robber. This is not always a successful dodge, however, and the attacked and attacking party both find themselves in the water instead of above it; a predicament that matters _..-little to the gannet, but 1, ., ..m. is serious, as we have seen, to the frigate-bird. We now come to consider the well-known pelicans, which have, wherever found, attracted a great deal of attention. Primarily, it may be. said, that they are utterly devoid of beauty, have an ungraceful, wrinkled bag the whole length of their under jaw or bill, and grunt as unattractively as many birds sing sweetly. There are about ten species, of which two are...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 146 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 272g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236908236
  • 9781236908230