The Miscellaneous Writings of Pascal; Consisting of Letters, Essays, Conversations, and Miscellaneous Thoughts (the Greater Part Heretofore Unpublished in This Country, and a Large Portion from Original Mss.)

The Miscellaneous Writings of Pascal; Consisting of Letters, Essays, Conversations, and Miscellaneous Thoughts (the Greater Part Heretofore Unpublished in This Country, and a Large Portion from Original Mss.)

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1849 edition. Excerpt: ...sentiments, under some circumstances of life; but we cannot excuse his heathenish views of death; for we must renounce every feeling of religion, not to desire to die as a Christian: while his aim throughout his whole book is to teach men how to hold life loosely, and quit it with ease. XX. What is good in Montagne must have been of difficult acquirement. What is bad (I mean apart from his morals) might have been corrected with ease; he should have had a hint that he tells too many stories, and talks too much of himself. XXI. When we cannot attain to truth, it is as well that there should be extant some common and prevalent error, which gives a degree of stability to the mind; such as attributing changes of season, the progress of diseases, &c., to the moon. For the chief evil of man is a restless curiosity into things, of which he cannot In the margin are written, Nos. 730 and 231, which no doubt refer to the pages in Pascal's edition of the "Essays." acquire a knowledge; and error is less injurious than this fruitless curiosity. + The mode of writing most usual with Epictetus, Montague, and Salomon de Tultie, is that which impresses the most, dwells longest in the memory, and is most apt for quotation; inasmuch as it consists of thoughts thrown out from the ordinary occurrences of life. Thus, when reference is made to the vulgar error--that the moon has an effect upon everything, we are always reminded of Salomon de Tultie's remark, --" When truth cannot be discovered, it is well that there should be some universal error," &c.; which is the thought adduced above. XXII. + MartiaVs Epigrams. Man is prone to malignity; yet it is not directed against the unhappy, but against the proud and happy: to suppose the contrary is...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 106 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 204g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236635256
  • 9781236635259