The Miscellaneous Works of the Late Reverend and Learned Conyers Middleton; Containing All His Writings, Except the Life of Cicero Many of Which Were Never Before Published

The Miscellaneous Works of the Late Reverend and Learned Conyers Middleton; Containing All His Writings, Except the Life of Cicero Many of Which Were Never Before Published

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1752 edition. Excerpt: ... dicam, spiritu, sententiam ducit ipse, quid fieri turn potuit? jampridem periera-non aliense adsentitus est. Tunft. F.p. mus. ibid. 14. 10. p. z 1, 2 Tantamne patientiam, Dii boni? if of uajlorian rank i. But how does it appear, that no body but Cicero, had ever made the fame motion either in that, or any other meeting of the Senate? For as this was but a part, and the most inconsiderable one, of those honors, which Cicero decreed to him, so it may be presumed, with regard to this particular article, that it had been proposed before by Servius, and that Servilius might move still, to carry it one step farther, so as to have OcJavius considered, as an AEdilician j and that Cicero might close with his friend Servius, and then add the other greater honors; the legal command of his army, with the rank and ornaments of a Praetor. This solution is intimated by Manutius 2; and may fairly be presumed, I say, upon the credit of these letters j till it can be shewn to be either absurd in itself, or flatly contradicted by a better authority. For otheiv wise, our Critic's argument is a mere petitio principii, . which doubly begs the question-, first, in rejecting the fact, because it is found in these suspected letters, and then rejecting the letters, because this suspected fact is found in them. He charges another inconsistency upon the eighteenth letter, which he discovers in these words;, as to Caesar, who has " been governed hitherto by my advice, and is indeed of an " excellent disposition and admirable constancy; some people " by most wicked letters, messages, and fallacious accounts " of things, have pushed him to an assured hope of the Con" sulship: which, as soon as I perceived, I never ceased ad" monishingshow more

Product details

  • Paperback | 170 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 313g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236550722
  • 9781236550729