Miscellaneous Pieces; Being Chiefly Original Essays, on Social, Moral, Economical, and Political Subjects, Delivered Before the Members of the Berkeley Mutual Improvement Society, at Liberty Hall, Mitcham, in the Winter Sessions Volume 20

Miscellaneous Pieces; Being Chiefly Original Essays, on Social, Moral, Economical, and Political Subjects, Delivered Before the Members of the Berkeley Mutual Improvement Society, at Liberty Hall, Mitcham, in the Winter Sessions Volume 20

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1892 edition. Excerpt: ...since been enlarged and beautified. In the reign of King John the civic importance was greatly increased, and the Corporation assumed that form and power, which, with few alterations, it has maintained till the present time. In 1212 a dreadful fire occurred, by which 3,000 persons 0 were killed. In 1258 the price of corn was so high that it caused a Famine, and 20,000 persons died in London of starvation. About 1315 another Famine occurred, when the deaths were so numerous the living could scarcely bury the dead. Parliament interfered, and fixed the prices of provisions; thus 20 eggs were to be sold for a penny, and no more; the best cow, 12s.; the best hog, 2 years old, for 3s. 4d.; ditto goose, 3d.; best chickens, two for 1.d., and so on. So intense was the famine that Horse flesh was a delicacy, and even Dogs were eaten, and the poor ate their own children; whilst those in prison devoured the new comers half alive. In 1348 and following years the Plague from India broke out in London, when-tliet. cemeteries were unable to hold the dead, and several new plots were added--in one near the Charter House 50,000 bodies were buried. In 1361 the plague reappeared, and in two days, more than 2,000 persons fell victims in London. ' In 1380 Richard II. passed an Act for levying a Poll Tax on everybody, male and female, over 15. Wat Tyler, of Kent, Whose daughterwas indecently used by a Collector of this tax, killed him, and being supported by the people, marched to London, a hundred thousand strong, liberated the prisoners, and levelled the Lawyer's houses; then, marching into the City, destroyed the Savoy Palace, one of the most magnificent in the Kingdom. They destroyed the Archbishop's Palace at Lambeth, and the Temple apd other...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 112 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236785681
  • 9781236785688