The Miscellaneous Papers of John Smeaton, Civil Engineer, &C. F.R.S; Comprising His Communications to the Royal Society, Printed in the Philosophical Transactions, Forming a Fourth Volume to His Reports - John Smeaton

The Miscellaneous Papers of John Smeaton, Civil Engineer, &C. F.R.S; Comprising His Communications to the Royal Society, Printed in the Philosophical Transactions, Forming a Fourth Volume to His Reports - John Smeaton

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1814 edition. Excerpt: ...bodies having the following properties; that when they are made to ascend against gravitation their absolute weight shall be less; and when they descend by gravitation (through an equal space) their absolute weight shall be greater; which, according to all we know of nature, is a repugnant or contradictory idea. A DESCRIPTION A DESCRIPTION of a new Tackle or Combination of Pullics, by Mr. John Smeaton. Philosophical Transactions, Vol. XLVII. Read June 11, fXlHE axis in peritrochio, and the tackle of pullies, are the only 1752.-I-mechanic powers, which can, with convenience, be applied to the moving of large weights, when the height, to which they are intended to be raised, is considerable. The excellence of the former is, its working with little friction; that of the latter, its being easily moved from place to place, and applied ex tempore, as occasion requires; but when the weights are very large they are used in conjunction. The present methods of arranging pullies in their blocks may be reduced to two. The first consists in placing them one by the side of another, upon the fame pin; the other in placing them directly under one another, upon separate pins. But in each of these methods an inconvenience arises, if above three pullies are framed in one block. For, according to the first method, if above three pullies are placed by the side of one another, as the last part of the rope by which the draught is made (or, as it is commonly called, the fall of the tackle) must necessarily be upon the outside pulley or fhieve; the difference of the friction of the pulley will produce so great a tendency to pull the block awry, that as much will be lost by the rubbing of the shieves against the block, on account of its obliquity, as will be got by...show more

Product details

  • 12-17
  • Paperback | 76 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236630165
  • 9781236630162