Miscellanea Graphica; Representations of Ancient, Medieval, and Renaissance Remains in the Possession of Lord Londesborough

Miscellanea Graphica; Representations of Ancient, Medieval, and Renaissance Remains in the Possession of Lord Londesborough

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1857 edition. Excerpt: ...their lives, arms, and portable goods. A man, in the same way, stipulated for himself, his household, and his movable goods (mot, mes gens, et mes bagues). The art of the jeweler has been practised from a very remote period of the history of the human race; and in all ages, with the manners of which we are at all acquainted, it has been the custom to adorn the person with that class of ornament to which we now more strictly apply the term bijouterie. It was the custom, at all times, to wear jewelry on the fingers and ears, on the arms (when bare), and on the neck. It was often placed also on the breast, and not unfrequently on the covering of the head. The principal display of jewelry among the Saxons and Franks was seen in the rich fibulae or brooches which were fixed on the exterior dress, by way of fastening, at the breast and shoulders, and which are often covered rather profusely with stones, --such as garnets, sapphires, and emeralds. A similar object, called then a fermail (fermaculum), was in use through the feudal period for the same purpose, --that of fastening the dress, --and it appears to have been usually placed just under the chin. The medieval romances often speak of the richness of the fermails. That of Parthenopex de Blois, of the thirteenth century, describing a lady's appearance, tells us that the fermail under her chin and the buttons of her vest were of rubies, and that her bracelets and armlets were of gold: "Le fermail desos le menton Sont de rubi et li bouton, Li bras sont fort par les manicles, Qui faites sont d'or, et d'ornicles." The practice of carrying jewelry about the person, by both sexes, might be illustrated by a multitude of examples from ancient writers. We are told, in the inventory of his goods, that...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 52 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 109g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236651812
  • 9781236651815