Minutes of Proceedings, 1899-1920; Roll of Members and Questions Discussed, 1821-1920, with Documents Bearing on the History of the Club

Minutes of Proceedings, 1899-1920; Roll of Members and Questions Discussed, 1821-1920, with Documents Bearing on the History of the Club

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1921 edition. Excerpt: ... as I know, a single advocate left in the Club, although nothing is so popular out of doors. December 7th, 1832. The Political Economy Club met yesterday for the first time this season. All the Parliamentary People were absent, busy with their Elections: but we had MCulloch, Senior, Tooke: we had likewise several strangers, who attended with a view to the questions that were to be discussed: Le Marchant, Secretary to the Lord Chancellor, Mr. Blencowe and Mr. Chadwick, Commissioners for the Poor Laws. The questions were whether it would be advisable to transfer the whole of the assessments for the Poor and administration of the Poor Laws to Government, or the collection and administration only: and to continue the present mode of Parish assessments or pay the rate out of the General Taxation of the Country.. Senior, who is the head of the Poor Law Commission, stated the case, and described the result of the information that had been collected all over the Country, as in the highest degree unsatisfactory and alarming. He had no doubt, that at least in the Southern Counties, the property of the Country was gradually absorbing by the Poor Rates; and said that it was nearly as progressive in Leicestershire, Norfolk and parts of Yorkshire and Lancashire. The administration of the Poor Laws was universally bad, ignorant, careless, profligate: the grossest abuses and misapplication existed in the agricultural districts; and in many places the amount distributed was much more regulated by the fears of the Farmers, whose stocks were exposed to destruction, than by any just principles. In many instances the rates were thrown in a very unfair proportion on houses; and the labour rate, which had lately obtained, instead of a money rate, was attended...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 132 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 249g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236754107
  • 9781236754103