Minutes of Evidence Accompanying the Second Report to the Legislature of the State of New York by the Commission Appointed Under the Chapter 518 of the Laws of 1909 to Inquire Into the Question of Employer's Liability and Other Matters

Minutes of Evidence Accompanying the Second Report to the Legislature of the State of New York by the Commission Appointed Under the Chapter 518 of the Laws of 1909 to Inquire Into the Question of Employer's Liability and Other Matters

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1911 edition. Excerpt: ...briefly the plan recently adopted by the General Electric Company to secure greater safety in their operations. A. The General Electric Company have several plants, as is well known, and in each one of their plants they have an inspector. They have formed a committee of safety of the general ofiice at Schenectady, which is the headquarters, and about once a month these inspectors and Committee, they meet at the different plants and discuss all of the latest appliances and make an inspection of the Plant, with suggestions for future guarding. Q. And I understand that a position has been recently created in Schenectady, which you occupy. Will you describe, as that position is occupied by you, what the duties of the position are? A. My particular duties are the inspection of our plant, as well as the other plants of the company, and approval of any devices that may be created. Q. How many men are employed in the Schenectady plant? A. Usually about seventeen or eighteen thousand; there are now about fourteen thousand men in the Schenectady plant. Q. In a general way, how are they divided, between the different--the metal and woodworking and the different kinds of operations that you conduct? A. How must I interpret that? Q. I mean to say, give us the number of men in the different kinds of shops? A. That is a pretty hard thing, to say just how that is worked. /Ve possibly have in the woodworking department, we may have four thousand, that is, men handling woodwork, and the rest of them are all given over to machinists, moulders and bench workers. Q. It is your duty to keep these shops under constant inspection particularly with regard to safety, and where you find a machine or a set of machines in which acci dents may occur, which you think...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 234 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 426g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236871103
  • 9781236871107