The Minstrelsy of the English Border; Being a Collection of Ballads, Ancient, Remodelled, and Original, Founded on Well Known Border Legends. with Ill

The Minstrelsy of the English Border; Being a Collection of Ballads, Ancient, Remodelled, and Original, Founded on Well Known Border Legends. with Ill

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1847 edition. Excerpt: ... It treats of the betrayal and desertion of a daughter of " the good Erle of Northumberland;" but which Earl, or in what age it happened, there are no means of ascertaining, further than he was a Scottish Knight, who proved untrue to his vows. "The fraud of man was ever so, since Summer first was leafy," so writes Shakspere, who took it in turn from that truly old English Ballad, "It was a Friar of Orders Grey," attributed with I know not what justice to Beaumont and Fletcher. I have added the last verse but one, as I thought the ends of Ballad justice would not be fulfilled, if the false Knight should escape condign punishment. Chopping the spurs from a Knight's heel, was the very height of degradation, a kind of knightly drumming out; whilst breaking the sword over the culprit's head was always resorted to, preparatory to execution for treasonable or disgraceful offences. The fair Flower of Northumberland. T was a Knight in Scotland born, Follow my love, come over the Strand; Was taken prisoner, and left forlorn Even by the good Erle Northumberland. Then was he cast in prison strong, Follow my love, come over the Strand; Where he could not walk or lay along, Even by the good Erle Northumberland. And as in sorrow thus he lay, Follow my love, come over the Strand; The Erl's sweet daughter walks that way, And she is the fair Flower of Northumberland. And passing by like ane angel bryght, Follow my love, come over the Strand; The prisoner had of her a sight, And she the fair Flower of Northumberland. And aloud to her this Knight did cry, Follow my love, come over the Strand; The salt tears standing in his eye, And she the fair Flower of Northumberland. "Fair lady," he said, " take pity on me, Follow my...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 64 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 132g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236533313
  • 9781236533319