The Military Achievements of Field- Marshal the Duc of Wellington, Contrasted with Those of Alexander; Pyrrhus, Hannibal, Casar, Marlborough, Napoleon

The Military Achievements of Field- Marshal the Duc of Wellington, Contrasted with Those of Alexander; Pyrrhus, Hannibal, Casar, Marlborough, Napoleon

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1854 edition. Excerpt: ...conveyance of himself and troops to Tarentum--nothing in the form of a plan had found its way into the bureau of the Epirot monarch, when he crossed over to Tarentum; for what was the remark of Pyrrb.ua after reconnoitring the Eoman army at Heraclea? "These people are not such barbarians, Megacles, as we took them to be: " a sentence which shows, either that Pyrrhus formed such a low estimate of the Eoman nation, that he deemed a military plan of operations altogether uncalled for, or that, if plan there was, it must have been drawn up on erroneous data, --so that, in either case, it may be said he acted upon no plan but such as his fancy prompted, day after day; for the plan of to-day was generally as different from the plan of the day following, as day is from night. In his conversation with Cineas, Pyrrhus talked of the conquest of Italy, of Sicily, and of Carthage, as a portion of the work which he had assigned to himself and followers to accomplish. With notes of those countries in his possession, the royal warrior, without giving the chances for and against his undertaking the smallest attention, crossed the Adriatic, and proceeded on his mission; until, coming in contact with two sturdy and rather unexpected opponents--Eoman courage and discipline, he received so much damage in the first and second collision that he was unable to keep the field with any prospect of success, and therefore crossed, without apian, to Sicily, -where, succeeding beyond his expectations, his ambition increased; and, as ambition never permits its votaries to enjoy the fruits of this world in peace, but hurries them onward to one iniquitous action after another, until they arrive at the summit of tyrannical power, falsely styled glory, or their hopes are...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 80 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 159g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236614178
  • 9781236614179