Microsoft Office Access 2007 VBA
23%
off

Microsoft Office Access 2007 VBA

3 (2 ratings by Goodreads)
By (author)  , By (author) 

Free delivery worldwide

Available. Dispatched from the UK in 3 business days
When will my order arrive?

Description

Business Solutions Microsoft (R) Office Access 2007 VBA Develop your Access 2007 VBA expertise instantly with proven techniques Microsoft Office Access 2007 VBA builds on the skills you've already developed in creating database applications and helps you take them to the next level-using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) to accomplish things you once performed manually. To facilitate this lofty goal, Access includes the VBA programming language. Even if you've never programmed, this book will help you learn how to leverage the power of VBA to make your work with Access more efficient than ever before. Microsoft Office Access 2007 VBA is for professionals who use Microsoft Access frequently in their daily work. You have serious work to get done and you can't spend all day reading a computer book. This book teaches you the essential skills you need to automate your databases as quickly as possible.Although written for Access 2007, the techniques and concepts covered will work in most versions of Microsoft Access. Highlights of This Book Include * Navigating within the Visual Basic Editor * Using variables, constants, and data types * Employing built-in functions * Creating procedures * Understanding object-and event-driven coding * Working with arrays * Understanding scope * Working with forms * Using selection controls * Creating reports * Exploring menus, navigation, and ribbons * Using object models * Working with data * Defining database schema * Using the Windows API * Working with XML files * Exploring Access SQL On the WebsiteDownload database files used in the book at www.quepublishing.com. Category Office ApplicationsCovers Visual Basic for Applications User Level Intermediate - Advanced Scott B. Diamond is a seasoned database designer and Microsoft Access 2007 MVP. During the last 20+ years, he has designed databases on a wide range of platforms, including dBASE, FoxPro, SQL/DS, Lotus Approach, Lotus Notes, and, for the past 10 years, Microsoft Access. Scott has worked as a consultant, both in-house and freelance, and as a support professional at firms that are among the leaders in their industries. Scott spends some of his free time answering questions at the premier site for Access support: http://www.utteraccess.com. Brent Spaulding started writing applications about 20 years ago and has utilized Microsoft Access since version 2.0. He looks forward to using Access well into the future. In July 2007, he received the Microsoft MVP award for Access, which recognizes his talent and contributions to the Access community. Front cover bullets:Edit and debug your codeUse looping and conditional statementsUnderstand the Access object- and event-driven architectureAutomate data entryLearn how to use variables for dynamic automationCreate user-friendly applications for othersCreate custom functions and objectsCustomize the user interfaceManipulate data and objects with code
show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 408 pages
  • 175.26 x 228.6 x 27.94mm | 635.03g
  • Que Corporation,U.S.
  • Indianapolis, IN, United States
  • English
  • 0789737310
  • 9780789737311
  • 1,876,675

Back cover copy

Business Solutions Microsoft(R) Office Access 2007 VBA Develop your Access 2007 VBA expertise instantly with proven techniques Microsoft Office Access 2007 VBA builds on the skills you've already developed in creating database applications and helps you take them to the next level--using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) to accomplish things you once performed manually. To facilitate this lofty goal, Access includes the VBA programming language. Even if you've never programmed, this book will help you learn how to leverage the power of VBA to make your work with Access more efficient than ever before. Microsoft Office Access 2007 VBA is for professionals who use Microsoft Access frequently in their daily work. You have serious work to get done and you can't spend all day reading a computer book. This book teaches you the essential skills you need to automate your databases as quickly as possible.Although written for Access 2007, the techniques and concepts covered will work in most versions of Microsoft Access. Highlights of This Book Include - Navigating within the Visual Basic Editor - Using variables, constants, and data types - Employing built-in functions - Creating procedures - Understanding object-and event-driven coding - Working with arrays - Understanding scope - Working with forms - Using selection controls - Creating reports - Exploring menus, navigation, and ribbons - Using object models - Working with data - Defining database schema - Using the Windows API - Working with XML files - Exploring Access SQL On the WebsiteDownload database files used in the book at www.quepublishing.com. Category Office ApplicationsCovers Visual Basic for Applications User Level Intermediate - Advanced Scott B. Diamond is a seasoned database designer and Microsoft Access 2007 MVP. During the last 20+ years, he has designed databases on a wide range of platforms, including dBASE, FoxPro, SQL/DS, Lotus Approach, Lotus Notes, and, for the past 10 years, Microsoft Access. Scott has worked as a consultant, both in-house and freelance, and as a support professional at firms that are among the leaders in their industries. Scott spends some of his free time answering questions at the premier site for Access support: http: //www.utteraccess.com. Brent Spaulding started writing applications about 20 years ago and has utilized Microsoft Access since version 2.0. He looks forward to using Access well into the future. In July 2007, he received the Microsoft MVP award for Access, which recognizes his talent and contributions to the Access community. Front cover bullets: Edit and debug your codeUse looping and conditional statementsUnderstand the Access object- and event-driven architectureAutomate data entryLearn how to use variables for dynamic automationCreate user-friendly applications for othersCreate custom functions and objectsCustomize the user interfaceManipulate data and objects with code
show more

Table of contents

IntroductionPart I The Building BlocksChapter 1 Advantages of Access and VBAUnderstanding Where Access Fits in OfficeUnderstanding Access Programming Choices Macros Using SQL Using VBAChapter 2 Using the Visual Basic EditorFirst Look at the Visual Basic EditorExplaining VBA ModulesEntering and Running Code Debugging Code Saving CodeGetting Help on Code Coding ShortcutsGood Coding Habits Using a Naming Convention Indenting DocumentingChapter 3 Using Variables, Constants, and Data TypesDeclaring Variables and Constants Declaring Variables Using Option Explicit Naming Variables Constants Declaring ConstantsVBA Data TypesReferencing SyntaxCase Study:Using Form ReferencesChapter 4 Using Built-In FunctionsWhat Are Functions?Converting Data Types Converting to a Boolean Data Type Converting to a Date Data Type Converting to an Integer Data Type Converting to a String Data Type Converting to a Variant Data Type Converting Null ValuesWorking with Date Functions Returning the Current Date Performing Date Arithmetic Determining the Difference Between Two Dates Extracting Parts of Dates Creating Dates from the Individual Parts Creating Dates from String Values Extracting a Specific Date or Time Portion A Conversion and Date ExampleUsing Mathematical Functions The Abs Function The Int Function The Rnd Function A Mathematical Functions ExampleUsing Financial Functions The Ddb Function The FV Function The Pmt Function The Rate Function A Financial Functions ExampleManipulating Text Strings The Asc Function The Chr Function The Case Functions The Len Function The Left, Right, and Mid Functions The Replace Function The Split Function The Trim FunctionsFormatting Values Applying User-Defined FormatsDomain Aggregate Functions The DLookup Function The DCount Function The DMax/DMin FunctionsUsing the Is FunctionsInteraction The MsgBox Function The InputBox FunctionCase Study:Add Work DaysChapter 5 Building ProceduresTypes of Procedures Subroutines Functions Assigning a Data Type to a Function Public Versus PrivatePassing Arguments Using Optional Arguments and Default Values Passing Arguments By Reference Passing Arguments By ValueError Handling Using On Error Resume Next Using On Error GotoChapter 6 Conditional and Looping StatementsIntroducing Flow of Control StatementsUsing If...Then...Else A Simple If Statement More Complex Conditions Including an Else Clause Including an ElseIf ClauseUsing Select CaseUsing For...Next Using the Step Clause Other Ways to Set the Counter Nesting For...Next Loops Aborting a For...Next LoopUsing Do Loops A Simple Do Loop Do Loop Flavors Aborting a Do LoopUsing GoToCase Study: Calculating BonusesChapter 7 Working with ArraysIntroducing ArraysDeclaring a Fixed-Size ArrayUnderstanding an Array's Index Using Option BaseWorking with Array Elements Assigning Array Elements Using Array Element ValuesArrays with Multiple DimensionsExpanding to Dynamic Arrays About ReDim Erase StatementChapter 8 Object and Event-Driven CodingUnderstanding Objects Creating Objects in Code Reading and Setting Object PropertiesInvoking MethodsUsing CollectionsWorking with an Object Model Using the Object Model Using References The Object BrowserCreating ObjectsWorking with EventsChapter 9 Understanding Scope and LifetimeScope Explained Procedure-Level Variables Module-Level Variables and Constants Public Variables and ConstantsMeasuring the Lifetime of a Variable or Constant The Lifetime of a Procedure-Level Variable The Lifetime of a Module-Level Variable The Lifetime of a Public VariableUsing Static VariablesCase Study:Tracking the Current UserPart II Working Within the User InterfaceChapter 10 Working with FormsOpening and Closing Forms Opening a Form Passing Arguments Using OpenArgs Closing a FormThe Form ModuleForm and Control PropertiesForm EventsCase Study:Adding to a Combo BoxChapter 11 More on Event-Driven CodingResponding to EventsThe Event Sequence for Controls Focus Events Data Events Control Specific EventsThe Event Sequence for Forms Navigation Events Data Events Behind the Scenes: Data BuffersThe Event Sequence for ReportsCancelling EventsCase Study:Validating DataChapter 12 Working with Selection ControlsSelection ControlsPopulating a List Control A Filtering List ControlAdding to the List-Or Not Updating a Table/Query ListWorking with Option GroupsWorking with MultiSelect Controls Determining What Is and Isn't SelectedCase Study: Selecting Multiple ItemsChapter 13 Working with Other ControlsWorking with Text Boxes Key Properties of Text Boxes Tracking the FocusWorking with Check Boxes, Radio Buttons, or Toggle ButtonsWorking with SubformsWorking with the Tag PropertyCase Study: An Audit TrailChapter 14 Working with ReportsAn introduction to the Report Module and EventsOpening and Closing Reports Opening a Report Closing a ReportPassing Argument Using OpenArgsPopulating the Report Applying a Filter and Sort OrderHandling Report-Level Errors What to Do When There Is No DataWorking with SubreportsCase-Study: Product CatalogChapter 15 Menus, Navigation, and RibbonsIntroducing MenusCreating Form-Based MenusManaging the Navigation PaneUsing Custom RibbonsChapter 16 Application CollectionsUnderstanding Application CollectionsRetrieving Lists of ObjectsWorking with Object PropertiesProgrammatically Determining DependenciesCase Study:Version ControlPart III Working with DataChapter 17 Object Models for Working with DataWhat They Are and Why We Need ThemData Access ObjectsActiveX Data ObjectsActiveX Data Objects Extensions for Data DefinitionObject Model SelectionChapter 18 Creating SchemaOverviewCreating Databases Using the DAO Object Model Using the ADOX Object ModelCreating Tables Using the DAO Object Model Using the ADOX Object ModelCreating Fields Using the DAO Object Model Using the ADOX Object ModelCreating Indexes Using the DAO Object Model Using the ADOX Object ModelCreating Relationships Using the DAO Object Model Using the ADOX Object ModelCreating Queries Using the DAO Object Model Using the ADOX Object ModelCase Study: Updating an Existing Database InstallationChapter 19 Data ManipulationConnecting to a Data Source Using the DAO Object Model Using the ADO Object ModelOpening a Recordset Using the DAO Object Model Using the ADO Object ModelInserting Data DAO'S Execute Method ADO's Execute Method DAO'S AddNew Method ADO'S AddNew MethodFinding Data Limiting Records Retrieved DAO's FindFirst, FindNext, FindLast, and FindPrevious Methods DAO's Seek Method Using DAO's Filter Method Using ADO's Find Method Using ADO's Seek Method Using ADO's Filter PropertyUpdating DataDeleting Data DAO'S Delete Method for a Recordset Object ADO's Delete Method for a Recordset ObjectCase Study: Backing Up DataChapter 20 Advanced Data OperationsCreating Linked TablesData Definition LanguageSchema RecordsetsSubqueriesPart IV Advanced VBAChapter 21 Working with Other Data FilesUnderstanding File I/OOpening Files About mode About access About locking Demonstrating Opening a FileReading from Files Using Input Using Line Input # Using Input #Writing to FilesPrinting to FilesCase Study:Using .ini FilesChapter 22 Working with Other ApplicationsUnderstanding AutomationSetting Object ReferencesCreating Objects Using CreateObject Using GetObject Using Early BindingWorking with Automation Servers Talking To Excel Talking to WordCase Study:Using Excel ChartsChapter 23 Working with XML FilesUnderstanding XMLUsing ExportXML An Example of Exporting Exporting a Web-Ready File Exporting Related DataUsing ImportXML An Import ExampleChapter 24 Using the Windows APIDeclaring API CallsUsing API CallsAPI Calls You Can Use from Access Check Whether an Application Is Loaded Capture the Network Login ID Retrieving the Name of the Program Associated with a Data FileKnowing When to Use the Windows APICase Study: Capturing a Filename to Use for ProcessingAppendix A Review of Access SQLIntroduction to SQLSQL Structure and SyntaxThe SELECT Statement The SQL Predicates The SQL FROM Clause The SQL WHERE Clause The SQL ORDER BY Clause The SQL GROUP BY Clause The SQL HAVING ClauseThe INSERT StatementThe UPDATE StatementThe SELECT INTO StatementThe DELETE StatementCrosstabs 0789737318 TOC 10/31/2007
show more

About Scott B. Diamond

Scott B. Diamond has been an information technology geek for more than 20 years. He has spent much of that time designing databases on various platforms. He started using Microsoft Access with Office 97 and has mastered all the subsequent versions. Besides developing database applications for the company where he's employed as an applications administrator, Scott also does freelance work, developing Access applications and consulting. He has always maintained that he's lucky his vocation is also his avocation, so he spends some of his free time helping people on web-based Q&A boards such as utteraccess.com (the premier support site for Access). He recently received Microsoft's MVP award for Access in acknowledgment of his contribution to the Access community. Scott, an avid bicyclist, lives on Long Island, New York, with his wife and daughter. You can reach Scott at AccessVBA@diamondassoc.com or visit his website, www.diamondassoc.com. Brent Spaulding started writing applications about 20 years ago, generally focusing on data and data analysis. He has designed systems that have a wide range of focus: gymnastics class management, product assembly analysis, equipment fault logging, and manufacturing management systems. He has used Microsoft Access since version 2.0 and looks forward to using Access well into the future. In July 2007 Brent, who is employed in the automotive industry, received the Microsoft MVP award for Access, which recognizes his talent and contribution to the Access community. He spends much of his personal time learning and helping others on websites such as utteraccess.com, where he is known as datAdrenaline. Brent lives in southern Indiana with his wife and children.
show more

Rating details

2 ratings
3 out of 5 stars
5 0% (0)
4 0% (0)
3 100% (2)
2 0% (0)
1 0% (0)
Book ratings by Goodreads
Goodreads is the world's largest site for readers with over 50 million reviews. We're featuring millions of their reader ratings on our book pages to help you find your new favourite book. Close X