Messages from the Governors, Comprising Executive Communications to the Legislature and Other Papers Relating to Legislation from the Organization of the First Colonial Assembly in 1683 to and Including the Year 1906, with Notes

Messages from the Governors, Comprising Executive Communications to the Legislature and Other Papers Relating to Legislation from the Organization of the First Colonial Assembly in 1683 to and Including the Year 1906, with Notes

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1909 edition. Excerpt: ...State of that contract, I cannot but think it unwise l'.l1; to bind the State to the one contract already made and t) prohibit the Superintendent of Public Works from entering into other contracts with other corporations in case the Cataract General Electric Company failed to comply with the conditions imposed upon it or failed to complete the project of furnishing electric power for canal purposes between Buffalo and Albany within three years, as it is required to do by the contract. While sharing, therefore, the legislative approbation of this contract, as implied by the passage of the bill before me, I think the authority conferred by the act of last year should remain unrepealed. The contract alluded to has been so persistently misrepresented in some quarters and its advantages to the State have been so little understood that I am glad of this opportunity of calling public attention to its principal features. I do this the more confidently because of the ofiicial interest which I have taken in the adoption of electricity as a motive power on the canals, and because this particular contract was drawn under my supervision after consultation with men best equipped with the knowledge and experience required for the task. Assuming the feasibility of using electricity as a power in propelling canal boats, and its superiority over steam, horse and mule power, the question presented is whether the State itself shall establish and operate the necessary' electric plant, or whether this shall be left to private enterprise. Clearly the only advantage of the State's incurring this enormous expense is to be able to control the rates at which the electric power shall be furnished to boatmen. If the State can control the rates and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 278 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 15mm | 499g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236781724
  • 9781236781727