The Mercantile Navy Improved; Or, a Plan for the Greater Safety of the Lives & Property in Steam Vessels, Packets, Smacks, and Yachts. with Explanatory Drawings and an Appendix, Containing the Author's Evidence Before a Committee of the

The Mercantile Navy Improved; Or, a Plan for the Greater Safety of the Lives & Property in Steam Vessels, Packets, Smacks, and Yachts. with Explanatory Drawings and an Appendix, Containing the Author's Evidence Before a Committee of the

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1832 edition. Excerpt: ...about the runs, and forward, which it would not be practicable to get at to caulk 5 but in this case use a little mastic mixed with oil, or the other substances recommended, in such parts, which will preserve the wood, keep soft and pliable, notwithstanding the working or straining of the vessel, and prevent the admission of water from the outside. Quick-lime and fish oil, mixed together, might also be used advantageously for this purpose; and either of them would answer the purpose better than Roman cement, on account of their greater flexibility and pliancy. Either by caulking, or the use of these substances, the whole ceiling might be made perfectly water-tight; and even in the case of doubling the ceiling, but little space would be taken from the stowage. This doubling the ceiling would also very much strengthen the vessel. any new ships in His Majesty's Navy."--Knowles on Preserving the Navy. It will be observed that this doubling recommended by Mr. Snodgrass has just the effect of making the vessels solid from keel to gunwale, so far as the thickness of the plank recommended goes, in addition to the former outside planking, and it appears to me there cannot be a question of the advantages of it, and being put on the outside of vessels, it would strengthen them, add to their stability, take nothing from the stowage, and preclude the admission of water, in the first instance (the great point to be attended to, ) and, consequently, would be for preferable to doubling a vessel's ceiling. I am quite of Mr. Snodgrass' opinion, that a vessel, when doubled, is stronger and safer than when new without doubling. Supposing the vacancy between the outside and inside planking to be full of water, either salt or fresh, it would completely prevent the dry...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 48 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 104g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236656806
  • 9781236656803