Men of Mark in Georgia; A Complete and Elaborate History of the State from Its Settlement to the Present Time, Chiefly Told in Biographies and Autobiographies of the Most Eminent Men of Each Period of Georgia's Progress and Volume 6

Men of Mark in Georgia; A Complete and Elaborate History of the State from Its Settlement to the Present Time, Chiefly Told in Biographies and Autobiographies of the Most Eminent Men of Each Period of Georgia's Progress and Volume 6

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1912 edition. Excerpt: ...humble way. So he became a railroad laborer, receiving one dollar a day. The atory of hi- experiences and the vicissitudes of those days are interesting, though space can not here be given to record them. Faithfulness, which was uppermost in him in regard to everything which he undertook, soon gained for him the position of brakeman. Although business became very dull at this time, bo was so efficient that he was enabled to hold that position for five years, when he was promoted to that of conductor. He seems to have had the faculty in those days of making friends of the men immediately above him, for each and every one of them worked hard to have him promoted. Having then been promoted t' local freight conductor between Atlanta and Macon, a position which he held for ten years, he made a remarkable record for always having his train with the schedule, as he never missed a meeting point for three years and some months, except in the case of an accident to some other train. In 1881 his long and WILLIAM MARTIN ENNIS 205 faithful service brought another promotion, and he was made passenger conductor, a position which he held for seventeen years, until 1898. During all the years of active service on the railroad he had had but one serious accident, and that from no fault of his own. He felt, as he had reached the age of fifty, and had been so fortunate, that it was time for him to retire from the railroad service, which he did. He is partial to comparing the old ideas and methods employed in the railway system of those days with the modern plans now used. Then there were tallow candles to light the coaches, and links and pins to connect the cars. Now, they have self-couplers and electric lights. Then the best engine would pull sixteen cars--now, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 142 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 268g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236576411
  • 9781236576415