Memoirs of Russia; Historical, Political and Military, from the Year 1727 to 1744 ... with a Supplement, Containing a Summary Account of the State of the Military, the Marine, the Commerce, Etc. of That Great Empire

Memoirs of Russia; Historical, Political and Military, from the Year 1727 to 1744 ... with a Supplement, Containing a Summary Account of the State of the Military, the Marine, the Commerce, Etc. of That Great Empire

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1770 edition. Excerpt: ...those who got over it were so weakened and disabled, that they were in no condition to do any the least service, nor were thoroughly restored till after they had been some months in their winter-quarters. Never had the Russian army lost so ss many horses and oxen: this went so far, that though they had taken with 'them some hundreds of supernumeraries of those creatures, for a change in the service of the artillery, they had not, towards the end of the campaign, enough of them for the draught; for want of which, they were obliged to bury in the deserts a great part of their bomb-shells and cannon-balls. A great quantity ofthem was also left with the carriages in Poland, . which the train of artillery, and a part of the army, had crossed. The forages in the steps, beginning to fall intolerably short, from the Tartars having set fire to the grass, the army was forced to march, and encamp several days successively, without having any fodder for cattle of any kind. This obliged Munich to divide his army into several columns, keeping the rear-one with himself. By this means he greatly reljeved the forages. Towards the end of September, the whole army re-entered the Ukrain, and there went into winter-quarters. The marshal took up his at Kiow. In the way to the Dniester, the Rusiian army had taken the Complaint: liberty of passing over the Polish territories, upon which the "m" Pom" crown-general, count Potosky, sent to make complaint to count Munich; but as the enemies had also crossed their dominions to come against him, lie returned for answer, That he knew perfectly 'well the regard due to 'a ncutral country, and that he should not have set his foot in it, if the enemy had_not= 1738. made his complaints to the court of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 104 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 200g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236988809
  • 9781236988805