Memoirs of Rhode Island Officers Who Were Engaged in the Service of Their Country During the Great Rebellion of the South; Illustrated with Thirty-Four Portraits

Memoirs of Rhode Island Officers Who Were Engaged in the Service of Their Country During the Great Rebellion of the South; Illustrated with Thirty-Four Portraits

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1867 edition. Excerpt: ...on such a night, saying that I should catch my death of cold. When I told him that I had lost my blanket, he kindly lent me an extra one that he had. You can see every man was sorry to have such a man go, for he was the best and finest fellow that ever entered it. One of the officers asked him whether with twenty-five men he could meet a supply-train, about thirty miles off, and have it down at the camp by the next afternoon. He replied that if the officer ordered it, he should obey orders. Curtis brought the train into camp next day, at noon. He was a pleasant, good-humored fellow, terribly strict, and a general favorite." Discouraged by the delays in getting a commission, and wishing still to be in some service of the government, the ex-volunteer was appointed by his old chief at the Central Park, to a post in the working corps of the Sanitary Commission, of which Mr. Olmsted was secretary. Here Mr. Curtis was necessarily familiar with the actual condition of the army, and of public affairs at the most depressing and doubtful moment of the war. He did not write much, but he observed constantly, and what he did write, was full of sagacity. On the 14th of August, he says: "Regular army officers turn up their noses, and say that our volunteers do not know how to manage. True, but they are the only soldiers we are likely to have to do our fighting, and the sooner we remember they are what they are--incapable of taking care of themselves--and take care of them, and make them happy and willing to serve, the sooner we do our duty." He was not blind to the peculiar perils of the time. He stated them with appalling distinctness. But the brave heart exclaims fervently: "My voice is still for war, in spite of our traitors, our folly...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 174 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 322g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236504453
  • 9781236504456