Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Hugh Farmer; To Which Is Added, a Piece of His, Never Before Published. Also, Several Letters, and an Extract from His Essay on the Case of Balaam

Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Hugh Farmer; To Which Is Added, a Piece of His, Never Before Published. Also, Several Letters, and an Extract from His Essay on the Case of Balaam

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1804 edition. Excerpt: ...Mr. Farmer is so far from adopting this idea, that, on the contrary, he maintains That no effect Can ever be produced Contrary to the laws of nature; if thereby be meaned, the natural powers of All Orders of existence. (Dissertation on Miracles, page 6) And therefore he limited the phrase "the laws of nature," to the Rules by which the visible world is statedly governed. Dissertation page 7. See also pages 2-f-and 10. " By the laws of nature, I mean, those rules by which the visible world is statedly geverned, or the ordinary course of events in it, as fixed and ascertained by observation and experience; and particularly the order of the system to which we belong." A note is subjoined to illustrate the author's meaning. f "Effects produced by the regular operation of the laws of nature, or that are conformable to its established course, are called natural. Effects contrary to this settled constitution and course of things I esteem miraculous." Now Now there is an essential difference between an effect produced contrary, to the natural powers of all orders of existence, (which is an absolute impossibility, ) and an effect contrary to the stated rules by which the visible world is statedly governed, which are ever subject to the controul of him who made it. If Mr. Hume, by " the laws of nature," meaned--the Constitution of nature the violation of the former seems to imply some change or alteration in the latter. Accordingly Bolingbroke (cited by Mr. Fell, page 132) supposes that "the mechanical constitution of the material world is vio"lated, and the natural production of the "human understanding altered" by miracles. But these works, when considered merely as effects contrary to the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 73g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236598512
  • 9781236598516