Memoirs of the Life and Work of Philip Pearsall Carpenter; Chiefly Derived from His Letters

Memoirs of the Life and Work of Philip Pearsall Carpenter; Chiefly Derived from His Letters

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1880 edition. Excerpt: ...to the Apostle of Peace, another to the Martyr for the Enslaved! On Noah Worcester's was inscribed, "Blessed are the peacemakers." There is a long inscription on the monument in memory of Rev. C. T. Torrey, who was arrested in Baltimore, June 24, 1844, for aiding slaves to regain their liberty, and died in the Penitentiary of that city, May 9, 1846. He visited many of the institutions for which Boston is renowned; but what touched him most was the Channing Home. Miss Ryan, who had been brought up with her sister at an Orphan Asylum, gained a living by dressing ladies' hair. She had taken to heart the condition of the poor in time of sickness, and got leave, two or three years before, to use the unoccupied vestry of Dr. Channing's church, and fitted it up with beds. She took in the first sick person she came across, and others one by one, maintaining them as well as herself by her trade. She was a Roman Catholic, but had a great love for the Unitarians and their ways, though she shuddered at their doctrines! When the church was pulled down, some of the ladies belonging to it raised a fund to fit up a house: they wished to call it the Ryan Home; but this was utterly opposed At the public schools he noted the dialect: "The Massachusetts tune is at the same time drawling and bounding; proceeding in a succession of slow leaps, something like the motion of a Truncatella." to her unobtrusive nature, and she would only accept it as the Channing Home. Philip had a deep religious sympathy with the spirit she displayed. They both felt great delight in good Cardinal Cheverus, whose Memoir was published in Philip's boyhood. The Cathedral where he ministered was very near Dr. Channing's church, and Philip made a pilgrimage to see the altar...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 148 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 277g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236495829
  • 9781236495822