Memoirs of the Life and Times of Daniel de Foe; Containing a Review of His Writings, and His Opinions Upon a Variety of Important Matters, Civil and Ecclesiastical

Memoirs of the Life and Times of Daniel de Foe; Containing a Review of His Writings, and His Opinions Upon a Variety of Important Matters, Civil and Ecclesiastical

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1830 edition. Excerpt: ...of Mar, one of the Secretaries of State, announced the intention of government to take charge of the prosecution, by which it fell to the ground. The printer and publisher were soon released; and the Treasurer, who behaved with his usual cunning, whilst he disclaimed any knowledge of the pamphlet, and joined in its condemnation, forwarded a hundred pounds to Swift for STEELE EXPELLED THE COMMONS. 349 the service of the former, with a promise of further aid.# In consequence of an address from the Lords, the queen offered a reward of 300/. for the discovery of the author, but this was all grimace; for he was wrell enough knowni to the ministers, who entertained him daily, and approved of his performance. The writer of the Crisis, however, did not escape so well. Steele had been returned to parliament for the borough of Stockbridge, and, as he was likely to become troublesome to the ministers, it was resolved to get rid of him by a petition against his return. But as this would have taken up some time, a more compendious method was resorted to, by a complaint to the House against three of his publications, as tending to sedition, and highly reflecting upon the administration and government. These wrere the Crisis, and two numbers of the Englishman. The subject was brought forward upon the 12th of March, and adjourned to the 18th, when Steele, having acknowledged the works, made an able defence, which occupied three hours. In the course of his speech, he read the paragraphs complained of, and owned that he did it "with the same cheerfulness and satisfaction with which he abjured the Pretender." He was strongly supported by Walpole and others; but the ministerial party prevailed, and he was sentenced to be expelled the House. Three...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 238 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 431g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236963687
  • 9781236963680