Memoirs of the Life of David Rittenhouse, LLD. F.R.S; Late President of the American Philosophical Society, &C. Interspersed with Various Notices of Many Distinguished Men with an Appendix, Containing Sundry Philosophical and Other

Memoirs of the Life of David Rittenhouse, LLD. F.R.S; Late President of the American Philosophical Society, &C. Interspersed with Various Notices of Many Distinguished Men with an Appendix, Containing Sundry Philosophical and Other

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1813 edition. Excerpt: ...expatiate freely in the superior celestial fields, --what amazing discoveries may yet be made among the fixed stars! That grand phenomenon the Milky way, seems to be the clue, that will one day guide us." Such were the expectations entertained by our Philosopher, more than three years before the date of Mr. Mayer's communication of his discovery to the Philosophical Society;--a discovery which Mr. Rittenhouse, in his letter to that great astronomer, styles "excellent;" and one that proves his own "presage" to have been well founded. He, at the same time, modestly suggests to Mr. Mayer, the institution of a comparison between the many observations he had already made, in order to determine, whether the several changes observed will agree with any imagined motion of our system; remarking, that those he had communicated, seemed to favour such a supposition. How important soever, in relation to astronomy, the phenomena observed by Mayer may be, the honour of first discovering them certainly belongs to him. Mr. Rittenhouse was not the discoverer: nor had he ever access to so complete and expensive an astronomical apparatus, as that used by Mayer on the occasion, and with which he was furnished by means of princely munificence. But all candid men of science will, nevertheless, be disposed to allow the American Astronomer no inconsiderable share of merit for the early "presage," which his deep-discerning and vastly comprehensive mind enabled him to suggest, of some such future discoveries. s s The writer of these memoirs deemed it his duty to do justice to the memory of the subject of them, by giving publicity to these interesting circumstances: and the performance of this duty is the more gratifying to the writer, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 176 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 327g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236503643
  • 9781236503640