Memoirs of Great Britain and Ireland; From the Battle Off La Hogue Till the Capture of the French and Spanish Fleets at Vigo Volume 2

Memoirs of Great Britain and Ireland; From the Battle Off La Hogue Till the Capture of the French and Spanish Fleets at Vigo Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1788 edition. Excerpt: ...Even Fenwick's accusation of his accusers, which is now known to have been in all points true, was, according to the continual art of those who surround the throne to represent their own enemies as enemies to it, made a criminal charge against him, in the following words of the bill: " As meant by false and seandalous informations to undermine the go-" vernment, and to create jealoufies between the King and his subjects."_ + Tindal. f' Fenwick's triaL THE King was blamed for srgning the warrant for execution; and his enemies, and even King James ct, imputed it to a private pique against Fenwick, for some indiscreet reflections on Williams conduct in-an action' in Flanders: But the posterity of those times will now judge, whether the' following be, or bessnot good apologies for the King: ThatFetiwick acknowledged he had been engaged in-a train of negotiations for severas years to dethrone him, a-nd even knew of an intention' to afsaslirtate him, yet had neither prevented it, nor put him on his guard against it; and that it was become imposlible for the King to pardon him, without an implication of the guilt of those whom he accused. weavers im-vers and smugglers, for carrying on a' smuggling trade with France', to the packed' prejudice of the Lutestring Company of London; in-the conduct of which they were very near getting into-a quarrel-with the House o? eens, wksszcther they should stand, or be permittedfffoff have feats, in attending the' tsirial, At last, the triaswas conductsied in Westssmirfster-Hall, with' als theappara; tus-which had attended that osif King Charles. And then from the King, the complaints of the public self upon Parliament: For, the uncesirtairity-of proceedings was remarked, which had not...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 177g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236846559
  • 9781236846556