Memoirs of an American Lady

Memoirs of an American Lady : With Sketches of Manners and Scenes in America, as They Existed Previous to the Revolution

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Description

Originally published in 1808, this work had long been out of print before being revived in this 1876 edition, which is enhanced by a biography of the author by her godson. A poet, letter-writer and essayist, Anne Grant (1755-1838) lived in America between the ages of three and thirteen, after which her family returned to Scotland. Described by the author as a 'miscellany of description, observation and detail', the book paints a charming picture of New York life in the idyllic world of pre-revolutionary America. Grant blends memories of her childhood in Albany with biographical details of her friend Madame Schuyler, of whom she wrote 'whatever culture my mind received, I owe to her'. Greatly admired by Scott and Southey, the book provides sketches of New York life alongside anecdotes of the Indians. For more information on this author, see http://orlando.cambridge.org/protected/svPeople?formname=r&person_id=grananshow more

Product details

  • Electronic book text
  • CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
  • Cambridge University Press (Virtual Publishing)
  • Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • 4 b/w illus. 2 maps
  • 1139060287
  • 9781139060288

Table of contents

Preface; Memoir of Mrs. Grant; Inscription; Introduction; 1. Origin of the settlement of Albany; 2. The Five Nations - John and Philip Schuyler; 3. Colonel Schuyler and five Sachems visit England; 4. Colonel Schuyler and the Sachems; 5. State of religion among the settlers; 6. Description of Albany; 7. Gentle treatment of slaves among the Albanians; 8. Education and early habits of the Albanians; 9. First adventures of the Indian traders; 10. Marriages, amusements, rural excursions, etc.; 11. Winter amusements; 12. Lay-brothers; 13. Progress of knowledge; 14. Marriage of Miss Schuyler; 15. Philip Schuyler; 16. Account of the three brothers; 17. The house and rural economy of the Flats; 18. Description of Colonel Schuyler's barn; 19. Military preparations; 20. A refractory warrior; 21. Distinguishing characteristics of the New York colonists; 22. Adoption of children common in the province; 23. Colonel Schuyler's military partiality; 24. Progress of civilization in Europe; 25. Independence of the Indians how first diminished; 26. Attractions of the Indian mode of life; 27. Indians attached by conversion; 28. Christian Indians; 29. Madame's adopted children; 30. Death of young Philip Schuyler; 31. Hospitality; 32. Resources of Madame; 33. Followers of the army; 34. Arrival of a new regiment; 35. Plays acted; 36. Domine Frelinghuysen leaves his people; 37. Death of Colonel Philip Schuyler; 38. Mrs. Schuyler's arrangements and conduct after the Colonel's death; 39. Mohawk Indians; 40. General Abercrombie; 41. Defeat at Ticonderoga; 42. The family of Madame's sister; 43. Further success of the British arms; 44. Burning of the House at the Flats; 45. Continuation of the journey; 46. Benefit of select reading; 47. Gardening and agriculture; 48. Madame's family and society described; 49. Sir Jeffrey Amherst; 50. Pondiac; 51. Death of Captain Dalziel; 52. Madame's popularity; 53. Return of the 55th regiment to Europe; 54. Property at Clarendon; 55. Return to the Flats; 56. Melancholy presages; 57. Settlers of a new description; 58. Mode of conveying timber in rafts down the river; 59. The Swamp; 60. Mrs. Schuyler's view of the continental politics; 61. Description of the breaking up of the ice on Hudson's Bay; 62. Departure from Albany; 63. Prosperity of Albany; 64. Further reflections; 65. Sketch of the settlement of Pennsylvania; 66. Prospects brightening in America; Index.show more