Memoir of the Life and Character of Edmund Burke; With Specimens of His Poetry and Letters, and an Estimate of His Genius and Talents, Compared with Those of His Great Contemporaries

Memoir of the Life and Character of Edmund Burke; With Specimens of His Poetry and Letters, and an Estimate of His Genius and Talents, Compared with Those of His Great Contemporaries

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1839 edition. Excerpt: ...from Doctor Leland; he had leisure, talents, and almost every opportunity. When Lord Chesterfield was Viceroy of that kingdom, he was told that the Doctor intended to follow up a prospectus he had published on the subject of a voluminous history; his lordship one day at levee applauded the Doctor's intentions, but requested that he would make it a pleasant one. Mr. B. Your pleasant historians should be read with caution. Leland promised a voluminous history, and so far he has kept his promise, but he has not done justice to all. T. It is said that he had an eye to a mitre. Mr. B. Mitres and coronets will dazzle, but the truth is, he had an eye to his bookseller, and, to be candid, he went over it with a heavy hand. T. He has scarce dipped into the earlier ages. Mr. B. He was no antiquary, but he might have said a little more on the subject. Hooker says, "the reason why first we do admire those things which are greatest, and secondly those things which are ancientest, is, because the one is least distant from the infinite substance, the other from the infinite continuance of God." Neither has he detailed with candour the feuds betwixt the houses of Desmond and Butler. T. The implacable hatred that existed betwixt the two is astonishing. Mr. B. Struggles for power. I remember an anecdote of one of the Desmonds, I don't know which, who happened to be severely wounded in an engagement with a party of the Butlers; one of the latter threw him on his shoulders to carry him off in triumph, and as he passed along, tauntingly asked him, "Ah, Desmond, where are you now?" though quite feeble from the loss of blood, he collected all his expiring strength, and exclaimed, "Where am I? I am where I ought to be, on the neck of my...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 288 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 15mm | 517g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236641817
  • 9781236641816