The Medical Examination for Life Insurance and Its Associated Clinical Methods; With Chapters on the Insurance of Substandard Lives and Accident Insurance

The Medical Examination for Life Insurance and Its Associated Clinical Methods; With Chapters on the Insurance of Substandard Lives and Accident Insurance

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1900 edition. Excerpt: ...variations from the normal form: Fig. 65.--Fig. 1. Unilateral Retraction. Fig. 2. Spinal Curvature.--(Gee; modified.) Importance in prognosis. Emphysema.--The barrel-shaped chest is by no means invariably present in this disease, nor does it always follow that a barrel chest covers an emphysematous lung. It suggests asthma or emphysema, and demands a careful determination of the position and respiratory excursion of the lower border of the lungs and of the area of the superficial dullness of the heart. On the other hand, there is a tendency to overlook or fail to recognize a chest of the emphysematous type, because of the tendency of the spine to adapt itself to the changed diameters by a compensatory curve. In such a case, the typical emphysematous form is apparent only after the patient has been placed on a flat surface in the dorsal recumbent position. The long, narrow or flattened chest, with projecting, wing-like scapulae, narrow epigastric angle, drooping shoulders, and long, prominent neck, indicates a predisposition to phthisis, and calls for careful scrutiny of the lungs; and especially is this the case if the family history shows any tuberculosis in the members. Pseudoalar Chest.--Every thin chest is not a phthisical chest, and it should be remembered that a thorax approaching the alar type does not necessarily prove its possessor to be a victim of tuberculosis. As in the case of the barrel chest, the form merely suggests the presence of a morbid condition and the need of an especially critical examination. As regards the rachitic chest, the transversely constricted chest, pigeon-breast, etc., it need only be said that they probably all represent a failure in the early nutrition of the individual, combined with some chronic obstruction...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 142 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 268g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236516435
  • 9781236516435