Mathematical Tracts on the Lunar and Planetary Theories, the Figure of the Earth, Precession and Nutation, the Calculus of Variations, and the Undulatory Theory of Optics; Designed for the Use of Students in the University

Mathematical Tracts on the Lunar and Planetary Theories, the Figure of the Earth, Precession and Nutation, the Calculus of Variations, and the Undulatory Theory of Optics; Designed for the Use of Students in the University

By (author) 

List price: US$19.99

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1858 edition. Excerpt: ...provided instead of x we take x +. That is, one of the undulations may be represented by the same construction as the other, provided we suppose it in advance or in arrear of the other by half the length of a wave. The undulations (/9) and (8), or (7) and (e) in figures 36 and 37 have this relation to one another. And it will very easily be seen in fig. 37, that if we compound (8) with (/3) by a process similar to that which we used in fig. 38, (13), the elevations of particles in (S) will correspond to equal depressions in (/S), and vice versa, and consequently by their combination the particles will all be brought to their original position. The same will be true after the time-when (/3) has been changed to (7), and at the same time (8) has been changed to (e); and at every other time: and therefore there will be continued rest. Thus we arrive at the extraordinary conclusion that one undulation may be absolutely destroyed by another with waves of the same length transmitted in the same direction, provided that the maxima of vibrations are equal, and that one follows the other by half the length of a wave. Since the retardation of a whole length of a wave, or two whole lengths, &c., produces no alteration in an undulation, it is 3 5 plain that a retardation of--, --, &c. will produce the same effect as a retardation of-; and thus two undulations will destroy each other if the maxima of vibration be the same and the waves be of the same length and transmitted in the same direction; and if one follow the other by-, or--, or, &c. Jt m m 16. The reader is requested particularly to remark this apparently strange conclusion. It is of the greatest importance in Physical Optics, for the following reason. We shall refer hereafter to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 90 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 177g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236525337
  • 9781236525338