The Mathematical and Philosophical Works of the Right REV. John Wilkins; To Which Is Prefix'd the Author's Life, and an Account of His Works Volume 1

The Mathematical and Philosophical Works of the Right REV. John Wilkins; To Which Is Prefix'd the Author's Life, and an Account of His Works Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1802 edition. Excerpt: ...in the extremes. And this may be confirmed from those common arguments, In Gen. ad literara, 1. 3. cap. 2. I which are usually brought to prove the warmness of the third region; as you may see in Fiomundus, and others who treat of that subject. 'Tis the assertion of Pereriusf, that the second region is not cold merely for this reason, because it is distant from the ordinary causes of heat, but because it was actually made so at the first, for the condensing of the clouds, and the production of other meteors that were there to be generated; which (as I conceive) might be sufficiently confirmed from that order of the creation observed by Moses, who tells us that the waters above the firmament (by which, in the greatest probability, we are to understand the clouds in the second region) were made the second day, Gen. i. 1, 8. whereas the sun itself (whose reflection is the cause of heat) was not created till the fourth day, ver. 16, 19. To the other objection I answer, that though the air in the second region (where by reason of its coldness there are many thick vapours) do cause a great refraction; yet it is probable that the air which is next the earth, is sometimes, and in some places, of a far greater thinness; nay, as thin as the aethereal air itself; since sometimes there is such a special heat of the sun, as may ratify it in an eminent degree: and in some dry places, there are no gross impure exhalations to mix with it. But here it may be objected: if the air in the second region were more condensed and heavy than this wherein we breath, then that must necessarily tend downwards, and possess the lower place. To this some answer, that the hanging of the clouds in the open air, is no less than a miracle. They are the words of Pliny J: quid...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 84 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 168g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236520432
  • 9781236520432