Mathematical and Astronomical Tables; For the Use of Students of Mathematics, Practical Astronomers, Surveyors, Engineers, and Navigators with an Introduction, Containing the Explanation and Use of the Tables, Illustrated by Numerous

Mathematical and Astronomical Tables; For the Use of Students of Mathematics, Practical Astronomers, Surveyors, Engineers, and Navigators with an Introduction, Containing the Explanation and Use of the Tables, Illustrated by Numerous

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1827 edition. Excerpt: ...carefully noting what the chronometer shows, but without taking any account of the actual time. At any other hour when the sun is near the prime vertical, or most suitable for determining the time, I take altitudes expressly with this view, from which I discover the error of the same chronometer used for the lunars. Again, during the night I take lunar distances with the stars, on both sides of the moon if possible, at the moments most favourable, but never mind the exact time, only carefully recording what the chronometer shows. Now by the sights for absolute time I ascertain what was the error of the chronometer on apparent time at that meridian, and this same error, corrected for rate during the interval, I apply to each of the different times by the chronometer when the lunars were taken. By this means I get the apparent times due to the meridian, on which the absolute time sights were taken, with as much accuracy as if the whole, lunars and all, had been taken at that fixed meridian. The distances give the several times at Greenwich, and thus they all concur in settling the difference of time, between the first meridian and that chosen for taking the time, with a view of seeing what longitude the chronometer gives. Hence, if there had been an unseen current of some miles an hour of which no account could possibly be taken, still the result would not be vitiated thereby, but all the lunars would be found to contribute to the same end, thus making, according to Dr Wollaston's simile, the moon serve the purpose of a great Greenwich clock in the heavens. After having ' This is si ' r to the method given in Norie's Navigation. determined the true longitude and error of the chronometers when within a few days sail of the land, I run the remainder...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 76 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236600843
  • 9781236600844