The Materials Used in Sizing; Their Chemical and Physical Properties, and Simple Methods for Their Technical Analysis and Valuation a Course of Lectures Delivered at He Manchester School of Technology

The Materials Used in Sizing; Their Chemical and Physical Properties, and Simple Methods for Their Technical Analysis and Valuation a Course of Lectures Delivered at He Manchester School of Technology

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1912 edition. Excerpt: ... and remains as lead oxide after the alkaline scouring. "When the cloth comes to be "chemicked," it is converted into lead peroxide: and when this comes to be boiled a second time with alkali, it oxidises the cloth, and gives rise to very serious tendering. Lead is detected by adding to the zinc chloride solution hydrochloric acid, followed by hydrogen sulphide. As little as one part in 100,000 may easily be detected by the brown colouration produced. In larger quantities the lead will be precipitated as black or brown lead sulphide. Iron Chloride.--Ammonia is added until the precipitate of zinc hydrate first formed is redissolved, when the iron will remain in suspension as brown flocculent ferric hydroxide. This may be filtered off, washed free from zinc, and treated on the filter with acidulated potassium ferrocyanide. Any iron present will then be converted into Prussian blue. The Prussian blue test cannot be applied to the original liquor, as zinc ferrocyanide will be formed, and will mask the colour of Prussian blue. Free Acid.--Zinc chloride is neutral to methyl orange. Hence, if the solution reddens methyl orange, it should be corrected before use by the addition of a little zinc oxide or ammonia. The Use of Zinc Chloride in Sizing.--Zinc chloride is the most frequently used of all antiseptics. It is colourless, odourless and cheap. Like magnesium chloride, however, it decomposes on heating into free acid, and will thus cause tendering if cloth containing it is subjected to the singeing process before having been washed. It has been found by experience that when flour is an ingredient of the size, one part by weight of actual zinc chloride must be added for every eight parts of dry flour in order to render the cloth immune...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 42 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123659715X
  • 9781236597151