The Materials of Construction. a Treatise for Engineers in the Properties of Engineering Materials, Compiled from Textbooks Published for the Students of the International Correspondence Schools, and Specially Selected for the Use of

The Materials of Construction. a Treatise for Engineers in the Properties of Engineering Materials, Compiled from Textbooks Published for the Students of the International Correspondence Schools, and Specially Selected for the Use of

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1914 edition. Excerpt: ...whole number. The larger the amount of manganese added, the greater is the loss when other conditions remain uniform. This is shown in the table, as well as the greater loss for acid heats. It would be useless to attempt a definite statement on these points or as to the amount of manganese to be used for a given percentage in the steel. To go further, it may be stated that the ordinary loss of manganese when added in the furnace is from 30 to 40 per cent., which may be increased or decreased by variations in the practice, melting conditions, etc. 34. Recarbbnization in the L.adle.--In the Bessemer process the recarbonization is done in the ladle entirely for soft steel and almost entirely for high-carbon steel. In the acid or the basic open-hearth practice, many steel makers prefer to make all the addition in the furnace, while many others add a part of the ferromanganese in the furnace and apart in the ladle, generally about half in each; the latter, while not universal, is the more general practice; a few add the entire amount in the ladle. 35. Loss of Manganese.--With manganese, the only advantage of recarbonizing in the ladle is the economy, as the loss is less and may be taken at from 15 to 30 per cent., or from 10 to 15 per cent. less than in the furnace. The ferromanganese is not exposed to the action of the flame and much less to the slag, and the action of the metal must be less vigorous in the ladle than in the furnace; all of which go to explain the smaller loss. For medium-and large-size open-hearth heats the recarbonizer is not usually heated, but thrown into the ladle, so as to mix with the stream of metal. Occasionally it will be heated to redness, or always so when the amount is excessive in the case of high-manganese or silicon...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 208 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 381g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236564138
  • 9781236564139