Marvelous Wonders of the Whole World Being an Account of Thrilling Adventures, Famous Sights, Celebrated Voyages, and Renowned Explorations and Discoveries in All Parts of the Globe

Marvelous Wonders of the Whole World Being an Account of Thrilling Adventures, Famous Sights, Celebrated Voyages, and Renowned Explorations and Discoveries in All Parts of the Globe

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1886 edition. Excerpt: ...He has warm blood and breathes the air. He can keep under water for an hour at a time, or even two hours; but this is not his usual practice. Every ten minutes, or quarter of an hour, he comes up to breathe. He has a reservoir of blood which has had its share of oxygen, and is kept ready for use. This reservoir consists of a number of arteries, or vessels, which contain the blood that has been mixed with oxygen. They spread over the inside of the chest, and also of the ribs and the spine. They are found even within the skull. When the whale is a long time under water, and cannot get any oxygen from the atmosphere, he falls back on this store within. The blood can thus continue its course without becoming exhausted. When he does rise to the surface, which he is obliged to do at last, then the whole of the blood receives a supply. Part goes its way through the body, and the rest is received into the reservoir to be ready for use. The tube called the windpipe is not placed as our windpipe is. It does not open into the mouth, but at the top of the head. There is a lump where it opens, and the whale can keep his whole body under water except just this lump. And there is a kind of valve or stopper to the opening of the windpipe which exactly fits it, and can keep out the water, and also resist the greatest pressure. Indeed, the more pressure there is upon it, the tighter it fits. The whale begins to breathe before he quite reaches the surface of the water. The air rushing from the windpipe, and the water together, then the whale is said to " spout." WONDERFUL CONSTRUCTION AND HABITS OF THE WHALE. When the whale is struck by the harpoon, he is in a great hurry and fright. He dives down to the bottom of the sea with the utmost speed, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 264 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 14mm | 476g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236804945
  • 9781236804945