The Marvelous Story of Man; Embracing His Origin, Antiquity, Primitive Condition, Races, Languages, Religions, Superstitions, Customs and Peculiarities, with History of Civilization

The Marvelous Story of Man; Embracing His Origin, Antiquity, Primitive Condition, Races, Languages, Religions, Superstitions, Customs and Peculiarities, with History of Civilization

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1900 edition. Excerpt: ...in a kind of theatrical exhibition in which the pretended drawing of blood forms a prominent feature. A man is stripped and bound with his hands behind him and driven about at the end of long cords. The chief suddenly dashes into the crowd, and seeing the man, rushes at him with a huge knife, and apparently plunges it into his body, while the blood flows in great streams. The man pretends to stagger, fall, and die. His friends gather around him, but to the astonishment of the stranger he gets up, washes himself, and puts on his blanket. The red liquid which is used to imitate blood is made of a red gum, resin, oil and water. MODES 01-' SALUTATION. The Monbottoes of Africa hold out the right hand, and crack the joints of the middle fingers. The Niamniams, another African tribe, salute by hand-shaking, but they grasp the hand so tightly that the two middle fingers crack. Among the Balandos of Africa, when a man of low rank meets a superior he falls upon his knees, picks up some dirt and rubs it on his arms and chest, and then clasps his hands until the superior has passed. A tribe of New Guinea have a very ludicrous way of saluting. They pinch the end of the nose with the thumb and finger of the right hand, while at the same time with the left hand they pinch the stomach. The Eskimos salute by rubbing noses together. The Lapps press their noses together forcibly. My readers will not admire the following mode of salutation. I give it in the language of a traveler. Speaking of a chief of the Nuehrs of Central Africa, he says: " Grasping my right hand and turning up the palm, he quietly spat into it, and then, looking into my face, he deliberately repeated the process." In New Zealand when two friends who have not seen each...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 130 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 245g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236992342
  • 9781236992345