The Martinique Horror and St. Vincent Calamity; Containing a Full and Complete Account of the Most Appalling Disaster of Modern Times ...

The Martinique Horror and St. Vincent Calamity; Containing a Full and Complete Account of the Most Appalling Disaster of Modern Times ...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1902 edition. Excerpt: ... blast furnace, at which great forces were working. to-MAR '-'$9 Flames shot skyward in sheets that at times lighted up the entire island. For a few minutes the fires would drop back into the mouth of the crater, only to reissue with redoubled force. These flames continue to stream from the crater, and with so great force that they are visible from St. Marie, a village in the extreme north of the island. The atmosphere is full of dust and the heat is terrific. Life on the island is all but unbearable, and the suffering of the refugees who continue to crowd into Fort-de-France is extreme. "Rain fell to-day for the first time in a fortnight. This long drouth, and the fact that the grass has been buried under a layer of ashes, has made it particularly diflicult to obtain fodder for horses and cattle, which are dying in unprecedented numbers. Notwithstanding the rain, the temperature registers 1OO degrees Fahrenheit, a mark from which it has receded only during the fall of rain since very early in the morning. SEVERE MEASURES TO STOP LOOTING. "Despite the precautions taken by the authorities, looting continues in the north of the island, though it practically has been stopped in St. Pierre. In the country many houses have been robbed and burned. Soldiers have been sent out with instructions to take severe measures, if necessary, to put a stop to the disorders. In Fort-de-France supplies are being dealt out to the refugees by the authorities. A committee has been formed to investigate all applications for relief, so that those unworthy shall not impose up'on the generous. "Martinique mails, forwarded from Paris just prior to the disaster, arrived on May 18th. The newspapers print a number of private letters from...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 182 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 336g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236803329
  • 9781236803320