Maritime Interactions in the Arabian Neolithic

Maritime Interactions in the Arabian Neolithic : The Evidence from H3, As-Sabiyah, an Ubaid-related site in Kuwait

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Description

Excavations at H3, Kuwait, throw important new light on the economy of the Arabian Neolithic, the early history of seafaring and boat-building, and relations with Ubaid Mesopotamia. It is now clear that the inhabitants of the eastern seaboard of the Arabian Peninsula were active players in a complex network that linked Mesopotamia, the northern and southern Gulf and perhaps Iran during the 6th and 5th millennia BC. Excavations at H3, Kuwait, throw important new light on the economy of the Arabian Neolithic, the early history of seafaring and boat-building, and relations with Ubaid Mesopotamia. It is now clear that the inhabitants of the eastern seaboard of the Arabian Peninsula were active players in a complex network that linked Mesopotamia, the northern and southern Gulf and perhaps Iran during the 6th and 5th millennia BC.
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Product details

  • Hardback | 384 pages
  • 215.9 x 281.94 x 30.48mm | 1,655.6g
  • Leiden, Netherlands
  • English
  • 900416359X
  • 9789004163591

Back cover copy

Excavations at H3, Kuwait, throw important new light on the economy of the Arabian Neolithic, the early history of seafaring and boat-building, and relations with Ubaid Mesopotamia. It is now clear that the inhabitants of the eastern seaboard of the Arabian Peninsula were active players in a complex network that linked Mesopotamia, the northern and southern Gulf and perhaps Iran during the 6th and 5th millennia BC. Excavations at H3, Kuwait, throw important new light on the economy of the Arabian Neolithic, the early history of seafaring and boat-building, and relations with Ubaid Mesopotamia. It is now clear that the inhabitants of the eastern seaboard of the Arabian Peninsula were active players in a complex network that linked Mesopotamia, the northern and southern Gulf and perhaps Iran during the 6th and 5th millennia BC.
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Table of contents

Chapter 1: Introduction 1
Chapter 2: Stratigraphy and Architecture 9
Chapter 3: Pottery from H3 33
Chapter 4: Small Finds 67
Chapter 5: Boat-Related Finds 89
Chapter 6: The Lithic Industries of H3 105
Chapter 7: The Animal and Fish Bones 129
Chapter 8: The Bird Bones from H3 157
Chapter 9: Shellfish from As-Sabiyah: Evidence for an Intertidal Economy 163
Chapter 10: Paleoenvironmental Evidence from H3, Kuwait 189
Chapter 11: Conclusions 203
Appendix I: Other Fieldwork in As-Sabiyah and Beyond 213
Appendix II: Technical Report on the Comparative Compositional and Isotopic Analysis of the H3 Bitumen 261
Appendix III: Conservation of the Bitumen Finds from H3 289
Appendix IV: Radiocarbon dates from H3, As-Sabiyah and Ubaid-related Neolithic sites in the Gulf 291
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About Harriet E. W. Crawford

Dr. Harriet Crawford (Institute of Archaeology, University College London): Director, The Joint Kuwaiti-British Archaeological Expedition to As-Sabiyah. Dr. Crawford has had a long and distinguished career in Western Asian archaeology, having written numerous articles and books. She has a long-standing love of the Sumerians and their civilization. Prior to initiating the British Archaeological Expedition to Kuwait, she was a director of the successful London-Bahrain Archaeological Expedition, which excavated at Saar. She is currently an Honorary Visiting Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, UCL, and a Fellow of the McDonald Institute, Cambridge.

Dr. Robert Carter (Oxford Brookes University): Field Director, Co-Director, Pottery Specialist, The Joint Kuwaiti-British Archaeological Expedition to As-Sabiyah. Dr. Carter has worked all round the Gulf, in Kuwait, Bahrain, Ra's al-Khaimah, Abu Dhabi, Sharjah and Qatar, on sites and archaeological collections ranging in date from the Neolithic through to the Late Islamic Period. His research interests include ancient trade, the Bronze Age, ceramics and pearling.
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