The Mariner's Medical Guide; Designed for the Use of Ships, Families, and Plantations, Containing the Symptoms and Treatment of Diseases, Also, a List of Medicines, Their Uses, and the Mode of Administering, When a Physician Cannot Be

The Mariner's Medical Guide; Designed for the Use of Ships, Families, and Plantations, Containing the Symptoms and Treatment of Diseases, Also, a List of Medicines, Their Uses, and the Mode of Administering, When a Physician Cannot Be

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1884 edition. Excerpt: ...after which, twenty drops of the Muriated Tincture of Iron, (No. 31, ) three times a day, in a little water. Five grains of iodide of potassium, taken in a little water, three times a day, and gradually increased to ten or twelve grains, has proved, in a great number of cases, to be a most effectual remedy. The diet should be nutritious. Regular hours of sleep should be observed, and as much exercise taken as will refresh the system, without exhausting the strength. At the same time local remedies should be used; a strong infusion of nut galls, or white oak bark, should be injected up the vagina, or a wash, made of one drachm of sugar of lead, and one drachm of white vitriol, mixed and dissolved in a pint of water; let it stand and settle, then pour off the clear solution; either of these injections should be used three or four times a day. The bowels should be kept regular, by an occasional dose of Pills, (No. 34, ) or Castor Oil, (No. 33.) Prolapsus Uteri, or Palling of the Womb. This disease happens to females of all ages, but much more frequently to those who have borne children It is always a troublesome, painful, teasing disorder, and though it does not often destroy life, it makes it very miserable. It is generally the consequence of frequent miscarriages, profuse hemorrhages, difficult labors, and too early and violent exertions after delivery. In unmarried females it is occasioned by jumping, dancing, and too great exertions of the strength. It is sometimes produced by general weakness of the system, brought on by other diseases. Treatment.--The first thing to be done is to replace the womb in its natural situation; this may be effected by a recumbent position and pushing the organ back as far as it will go. It must afterwards be.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 44 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236870107
  • 9781236870100