Marco Paul's Voyages & Travels; In New York.- [V.2] on the Erie Canal.- [V.3] in Main.- [V.4] in Vermont.- [V.5] in Boston.-[V.6] at the Springfield Armory Volume 1

Marco Paul's Voyages & Travels; In New York.- [V.2] on the Erie Canal.- [V.3] in Main.- [V.4] in Vermont.- [V.5] in Boston.-[V.6] at the Springfield Armory Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1852 edition. Excerpt: ...are lines of packet ships which sail regularly, on New York merchandise. Maiden Lane. stated days, from New York to several of the principal ports of Europe. There is a line of packets to Liverpool, and another to London, and another to Havre, in France. The packets are large and very handsome ships, and they are fitted up to carry passengers, and also such articles of merchandise as are produced in this country, and are to be sent to foreign countries to be sold. These articles are conveyed to New York by canals, and railroads, and coasting vessels, and there they are put on board the packet ships to be sent to Europe. The great merchants in New York purchase them all over the country and send them away, and order other articles of merchandise, such as are produced or manufactured in England and France, to be sent back in return. The merchandise which the ships carry is called their freight. Mr. Edwards, Forester, and Marco turned off from Broadway down a broad and busy street called Maiden Lane, and from that into othei streets, in which the movement and the din continually increased as they advanced. Carts When this story wag written, these packet ships were the principal means of conveying passengers to Europe There are, however, now lines of steamships, in addition. Tho piers. Noise and tumult. and drays were going back and forth; the sidewalks were obstructed with boxes, and bales, and heaps of merchandise. In one place Mr. Edwards and Forester had to crowd through a narrow place, among bags of cotton; though Marco ran along upon the tops of the bags. At last the party approached the pier. A pier is a narrow projection, built out into the water from the shore, for ships to land their cargoes upon. In New England it is called a wharf. The...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 36 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236656415
  • 9781236656414