The Manufacture of Paper; Being a Description of the Various Processes for the Fabrication, Coloring, and Finishing of Every Kind of Paper ... Volume 3

The Manufacture of Paper; Being a Description of the Various Processes for the Fabrication, Coloring, and Finishing of Every Kind of Paper ... Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1886 edition. Excerpt: ... has been added exhale the same smell, even after boiling and cooling in an atmosphere free from carbonic acid (Vinckler, Dingl. Journ., cxcviii. 149).' Mixed with a little water, bleach forms a stiff paste, with a perceptible rise of temperature; if ground up with more water, most of it enters into solution (according to Fresenius first the calcium chloride), but there always remains a considera.blc residue, consisting chiefly of calcium hydrate, containing some bleaching chlorine, which can only be washed out by a very large amount of water. The aqueous solution has a faintly alkaline reaction, the smell of bleaching powder, and a peculiar astringent taste. This solution is almost exclusively employed in bleaching, as the residue would contaminate the paper-pulp, the fabric, etc., and even locally destroy them. M. F. Hodges has proved that after complete washing the insoluble residue of bleaching powder is quite harmless. "Bleaching powder decomposes gradually, even in the absence of air, as is proved by the instance communicated by Hofmann of the explosion of a tightly stoppered bottle, also in well-packed and protected casks--but especially under the influence of air and light. Sometimes the decomposition takes place quite suddenly, but only when warm bleach has been packed in hot summer weather. The shaking in a railway truck or a wagon also injures it more than quiet lying in a dark dry place. Hence the strength of bleach is nearly always guaranteed only at the place of shipment; ' According to Phipson (' Compt. Rend.' lxxxvi. p. 1196), sulphuretted hydrogen passed over bleaching powder causes the production of a smell of free chlorine: first h_-pochlorous acid is formed; and this with H, S decomposes into...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 166 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 308g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236868307
  • 9781236868305