Manual for Railroad Engineers and Engineering Students; Containing the Rules and Tables Needed for the Location, Construction, and Equipment of Railroads, as Built in the United States

Manual for Railroad Engineers and Engineering Students; Containing the Rules and Tables Needed for the Location, Construction, and Equipment of Railroads, as Built in the United States

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1878 edition. Excerpt: ... at Brooklyn, N. Y.f "The sustaining power of a pile driven home, the resistance which it meets with, and the force of the blow, are, of course, equal. The subsequent settlement of the material around the pile, however, increases its supporting power, and this varies in different kinds of soil. This increased support cannot, however, be relied upon if there is any vibration in the piles, or if there is a scour about them. "In foundations under water there will be a degree of fluidity given to the material by the operation of driving, which lessens the frictional resistance to the penetration of the pile, but the superior gravity of sand to that of water allows it to settle in close contact with the pile, and gives a greater coefficient of support, than if it was driven through the same kind of material in a dry state. "There is no increased force of blow obtained by a fall of more than 40 feet, as the friction on the ways increases so rapidly that no increased velocity is attained by falling from a greater height. Thirty feet is the most useful fall, as the machines are commonly made. "The steam hammer of Mr. Nasmyth has been very successfully applied to the driving of wooden piles. In this engine, a great number of very rapid blows from a very heavy ram produces an excellent result. The pile is not allowed to recover from one blow before it receives another. See also paper No. 5, upon Practical Engineering, by officers of the U. S. Engineers, Lieutenant Colonel J. L. Mason, on the Resistance of Piles. tThe valuable paper of Mr. McAlpine may be seen in full in the Franklin Journal, vol. 55, 1868, pp. 98 and 170. From this paper the deductions above are extracted. "The force of a blow from a Nasmyth hammer is much less, ...
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Product details

  • Paperback | 164 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 304g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236558642
  • 9781236558640