A Manual of Palaeontology; For the Use of Students; With a General Introduction on the Principles of Palaeontology Volume 2

A Manual of Palaeontology; For the Use of Students; With a General Introduction on the Principles of Palaeontology Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1879 edition. Excerpt: ...the means by which it is connected with the trunk. The scapula or shoulder-blade is never absent, and it is in the form of a broad flat bone, applied to the outer aspect of the ribs, and much more developed than in the Birds. The coracoid bone, which forms such a marked feature in the scapular arch of Aves, is fused with the scapula, and only articulates with the sternum in the Duck-mole and Echidna (Monotremata). In all other Mammals the coracoid forms merely a process of the scapula, and does not reach the top of the breast-bone. The collarbones or clavicles never unite in any Mammal to form a "furculum," as in Birds; but in the Monotremes they unite with an "interclavicle" placed in front of the sternum. The clavicles, in point of fact, are not present in a welldeveloped form in any Mammals except in those which use the anterior limbs in flight, in digging, or in prehension. The Cetacea, the Hoofed Quadrupeds (Ungulata), and some of the Edentata, have no clavicles. Most of the Camivora and some Rodents possess a clavicle, but this is imperfect, and does not articulate with the top of the sternum. The Insectivorous Mammals, many of the Eodents, the Bats, and all the Quadrumana, have (with man) a perfect clavicle articulating with the anterior end of the sternum. The humerus, or long bone of the upper arm (brachinm), is never wanting, but is extremely short in the Whales, in which the anterior limbs are converted into swimmingpaddles. In the fore-arm of all Mammals the ulna and radius are recognisable, but they are not necessarily distinct; and the radius, as being the bone which mainly supports the hand, is the only one which is always well developed, the ulna being often rudimentary. In the Cetacea the ulna and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 164 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 304g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236570170
  • 9781236570178