A Manual of English Pronunciation and Spelling; Containing a Full Alphabetical Vocabulary of the Language, with a Full Alphabetical Vocabulary of the Language, with a Preliminary Exposition of English Orthoepy and Orthography ...

A Manual of English Pronunciation and Spelling; Containing a Full Alphabetical Vocabulary of the Language, with a Full Alphabetical Vocabulary of the Language, with a Preliminary Exposition of English Orthoepy and Orthography ...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1891 edition. Excerpt: ...No. 2, 11) somewhat shortened; as in a-bound', tra-duce', ag'gra-vate, i-de'a, oom'ma. This shortened sound of the Italian a, as commonly uttered, resembles very nearly that of short u (No. 13, 22). When a, at the end of an unaccented syllable, is followed, in the next syllable, by n or by r, it has nearly the sound of short a (No. 6, 15); as in mis'cel-la-ny, cus't0m-a-ry. Vhen it is followed by a vowel in the next syllable it has the sound of long a (No. 14, 23) somewhat shortened, or without its vanishing element e; as in a-e'n'-al, aha-ot'ic. 'When a is not final in an unaceented syllable, it is apt to fall into the sound of short 14 (No. 13, 22); as in hag'gard, mor'al, ty'rant, wonflan. When the aspirate h follows a in a final unaccented syllable, as in Je-ho'vah, Mies-.s-i'ah, this vowel is considered by all the orthoepists, except Worcester, to have the same sound as when final in a syllable. Vorcester remarks that " a unaccented at the end of a word approaches the Italian sound of a," but adds that " ah final partakes still more of the Italian sound." 73. In the unaccented final syllable ate, the vowel 6 has generally a shorter sound, --approaching that of short e (No. 6, 15), --in adjectives and nouns than in verbs. Thus, it is shorter in del'icate, in'tri-cate, pri'mate, than in cal'cu-late, ded'i-cate, reg'u-late. 75. The vowel e, when final in an unaccented syllable, and not silent, has the sound of e in me (No. 4, 13), but less prolonged; as in e-jest', ce-meant', pre-fer', ap'pe-tile, el'e-giant. 76. The vowel e, in an unaccented syllable ending in a consonant, has properly, in most cases, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 46 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 100g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236740289
  • 9781236740281