A Manual of the Coniferae, Containing a General Review of the Order; A Synopsis of the Hardy Kinds Cultivated in Great Britain; Their Place and Use in Horticulture, Etc

A Manual of the Coniferae, Containing a General Review of the Order; A Synopsis of the Hardy Kinds Cultivated in Great Britain; Their Place and Use in Horticulture, Etc

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1881 edition. Excerpt: ...soil and situation in which it is growing. In the close forests in the neighbourhood of Monterey, it is drawn up to a height of 60 feet without a branch; on the outskirts of the woods, and when standing far apart, it grows a handsome tree, with wide spreading branches from the ground to the summit. At its northern limit, when growing close to the sea-shore, and exposed to the prevailing north-west winds it scarcely exceeds the height of a tall-growing shrub. Pinun inmgnis is one of the most ornamental of all the Pines, but it cannot be said to be sufficiently hardy in England, except in the south and south-west, to be relied on as a permanent decorative tree. In the severe winter of 1860-1 more than twothirds of the trees of this species then existing in Great Britain were killed; and in ordinary winters it does not always escape injury; the foliage is often browned and rendered unsightly by frost and piercing winds, and unripened PINX7S JEJTREYI. 165 Fig. 39.--Cono and leaves of Tinus insiiuis. Natural size. (From the Gardenm' Chronicle.) shoots are frequently killed. To secure fine specimens of P. insignis the young plants must have a sheltered situation or he "nursed" by the more hardy Pines and Firs. As the lower branches of the largest and finest specimens in this coiintry have attained a length of upwards of 30 feet, it is evident that a space having a radius greater than this should be provided to allow the tree to develope its line proportions. Being found on the Californian coast close to the lxach, P. insignis is one of the few Coniferous trees that will grow under the influence of the sea breeze, but never under exposure to cold winds. This Pino frequently suffers much, especially in its young state, from the attacks...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 128 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 240g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236862821
  • 9781236862822