A Manual of Clinical Diagnosis by Means of Microscopic and Chemical Methods; For Students, Hospital Physicians and Practitioners

A Manual of Clinical Diagnosis by Means of Microscopic and Chemical Methods; For Students, Hospital Physicians and Practitioners

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1896 edition. Excerpt: ...found. This figure is then corrected for the total amount of urine. Hence the equations, I., x = 15--2; II., 1000: x:: A: Ch, or in which Ch represents the quantity of chlorides contained in the total amount of urine, A the amount of urine actually passed, n the number of c.c. of the KSCN solution used in the precipitation of the excess of chlorides in 80 c.c. of the filtrate. i 6.5 T = 7.05. So in the above case Ch = 600 1000 The method described may be employed in the presence of albumin, albumoses, peptones, and sugar; the urine, however, must be fresh, so as to insure the absence of nitrous acid. Direct Method. If absolute accuracy is not required, the following method may be employed: Ten c.c. of urine are diluted with distilled water to 100 c.c. and treated with a few drops of a solution of potassium chromate. This mixture is titrated with a one-tenth normal solution of silver nitrate until the end-reaction--i. e., the occurrence of a faint orange tinge, which no longer disappears on stirring--is reached. The number of c.c. used multiplied by 0.01 will indicate the amount of chlorides present in 10 c.c. of urine. As uric acid, the xanthine bases, hypo-sulphites, sulpho-cyanides, and pigments are also precipitated by the silver nitrate, the endreaction is delayed; moreover, unless the urine be very pale, its recognition may be very diflicult, and the error thus caused quite considerable. This is especially true of febrile urines which contain only a small amount of chlorides. Should iodides or bromides have been taken, these must first be removed, as the iodide and bromide of silver, which are insoluble in nitric acid, would give too high a value. To this end the following method, which is a very accurate one, should be employed, its..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 194 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 354g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236849000
  • 9781236849007