Manual of Cattle-Feeding; A Treatise on the Laws of Animal Nutrition and the Chemistry of Feeding-Stuffs in Their Applications to the Feeding of Farm-Animals. with Illustrations and an Appendix of Useful Tables Volume 3

Manual of Cattle-Feeding; A Treatise on the Laws of Animal Nutrition and the Chemistry of Feeding-Stuffs in Their Applications to the Feeding of Farm-Animals. with Illustrations and an Appendix of Useful Tables Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1880 edition. Excerpt: ...cause the greatest activity of the oxidations in the body) coincides with the minimum of carbonic acid. We must therefore conclude that there is a connection between the carbonic acid excretion and the evaporation of water, and that an increased evaporation causes more material to be oxidized in the body, in order to make good the resulting loss of heat. Henneberg's experiments are the only ones which we yet possess on this important subject, but they suflicc to show its practical importance and the desirability of further experiments in the same direction. ' A direct influence of the amount of waterevaporatefl upon the protein consumption does not seem to be indicated by these experiments. Warming Ingesta.--A considerable quantity of heat (according to Henneberg, about 4 per cent.) is consumed in raising the food and drink of an animal to the tempelatllre of its body. Of this amount, by far the larger part is used in warming the water of the ingesta, both on account of its large amount and because a greater quantity of heat is required to increase the temperature of a pound of water one degree than is sufficient to effect the same change in a pound of any other substance. The effect of excessive drinking on the production of fiesh and fat has already been mentioned in the two preceding chapters, and there can be little doubt that a part, at least, of this effect is due to the demand for heat thus made on the system. The last line of the table on p. 235 affords an illustration of the influence of the amount of water drunk on the excretion of carbonic acid. Although the quantity of water evaporated is less than in the two preceding cases, saving of fodder eifected. If this were the only circumstance to be considered, the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 122 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 231g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236752929
  • 9781236752925