A Manual of Bibliography; Being an Introduction to the Knowledge of Books, Library Management and the Art of Cataloguing, with a List of Bibliographical Works of Reference, a Latin-English and English-Latin Topographical Index of Ancient

A Manual of Bibliography; Being an Introduction to the Knowledge of Books, Library Management and the Art of Cataloguing, with a List of Bibliographical Works of Reference, a Latin-English and English-Latin Topographical Index of Ancient

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1891 edition. Excerpt: ...Fig. 31.--Bookbinder's shop in the sixteenth century. Engraving by Jost Amman. Richenbach capellanum in Gyclingen." At the sale of the books of the learned Kloss of Frankfort, held in London in 1835, there were two works of St. Augustin printed in 1469, and bound in 1470 by this same Johannes capellanus. The inventories of ancient libraries of kings and princes furnish ample materials for the history of the bindings frequently described in them; and it is from these records that we know that books of prayer (Jivres d'heures), etc., were preferably bound in gold or silver, either chased or enamelled. One of the earliest specimens is probably the MS. Textus Sancti Cuthberti in the Cottonian Library, bound in a silver and gold cover with precious stones, by a monk of Durham, in the time of the Saxons. Mr. Astle also mentions two books in silver and gold covers, which he believes to have been bound before the discovery of printing. Benvenuto Cellini executed two covers in massive gold to rebind a book of prayers which the Pope, Paul III., wished to present to Charles V. The art of binding books, now attained to such perfection, had already made wonderful progress in the sixteenth century. Extraordinarily magnificent were the bindings in hog-skin, which from its thickness lent itself to the impressions of most beautiful ornaments. These bindings were still often enriched with finely-worked gold or silver clasps. At that time also there were executed in Italy very rich bindings in velvet with gold lace, or in tortoise-shell ornamented with gold, silver, pearls, or cameos. The Dutch bindings were also celebrated. They were in parchment with a fine ornament in blind tooling on the sides; an elegant and solid binding which formed the best ornament of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 36 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236646010
  • 9781236646019