Manners and Customs of the Ancient Egyptians; Including Their Private Life, Government, Laws, Arts, Manufactures, Religion, and Early History Derived from a Comparison of the Paintings, Sculptures, and Monuments Still Existing, Volume 5

Manners and Customs of the Ancient Egyptians; Including Their Private Life, Government, Laws, Arts, Manufactures, Religion, and Early History Derived from a Comparison of the Paintings, Sculptures, and Monuments Still Existing, Volume 5

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1847 edition. Excerpt: ...even for his mode of living; and, independent of being bound by duty to obey these ordinances, he was obliged on ascending the throne to become a member of their body. One of the most important ceremonies was "the procession of shrines," which is mentioned in the Rosetta Stone, and is frequently represented on the walls of the temples. The shrines were of two kinds: the one a sort of canopy; the other an ark or sacred boat, which may be termed the great shrine. This was carried with grand pomp by the priests, a certain number being selected for that duty, who, supporting it on their shoulders by means of long staves, passing through metal rings at the side of the sledge t on which it stood, brought it into the temple, where it was placed upon a stand or table, in order that the prescribed ceremonies might be performed before it. Vide supra, Vol. I. p. 249. f Like the coffins of the dead. Conf. Plut. de Is. s. 35. The stand was also carried in the procession by another set of priests, following the shrine, by means of similar staves; a method usually adopted for transporting large statues, and sacred emblems, too heavy or too important to be borne by one person. The same is stated to have been the custom of the Jews in some of their religious processions t, as in carrying the ark "to its place, into the oracle of the house, to the most holy place," when the temple was built by Solomon, t The number of shrines in these processions, and the splendour of the ceremony performed on the occasion, depended on the particular festival they intended to commemorate. In many instances the shrine of the Deity of the temple was carried alone, sometimes that of other Deities accompanied it, and sometimes that of the king was added; a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 154 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 286g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236574745
  • 9781236574749