Magic in Names and in Other Things

Magic in Names and in Other Things

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Description

MAGIC AND RELIGION In an article on " magic " contributed to Hastings's Encyclopcedia of Religion and Ethics, Dr. Marett says that " the problem of its definition constitutes a veritable storm-centre in the anthropological literature of to-day." The branch of Magic which now comes under survey plays an important part in modern belief and custom. To bring home the fact of this survival may cause surprise to some, had been talking prose all his life without knowing it. Magic, for the present purpose, is defined as the mana by which the sorcerer pretends to (in some cases honestly believes that he can) obtain control over persons and their belongings, to their help or harm, and also control over invisible beings and the occult powers of nature. Magic works in two ways; as black or maleficent, and as white or beneficent. The black predominates, because of the larger field of mentality wherein it works.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 248 pages
  • 215.9 x 279.4 x 14.22mm | 721.21g
  • Createspace
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1514655675
  • 9781514655672

About Edward Clodd

Edward Clodd (1840, 1930) was an English banker, writer and anthropologist. He was the only surviving child of seven.[] He had a great variety of literary and scientific friends, who periodically met at Whitsunday (a springtime holiday) gatherings at his home at Aldeburgh in Suffolk. Clodd was an agnostic and wrote that the Genesis creation narrative of the Bible is similar to other religious myths and should not be read as a literal account. He wrote many popular books on evolutionary science. He wrote a biography of Thomas Henry Huxley and was a lecturer and populariser of anthropology and evolution.show more