Magic, Divination, and Demonology Among the Hebrews and Their Neighbours; Including an Examination of Biblical References and of the Biblical Terms

Magic, Divination, and Demonology Among the Hebrews and Their Neighbours; Including an Examination of Biblical References and of the Biblical Terms

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1898 edition. Excerpt: ...against the evil eye.2 Probably it had on it the 113th or 114th suras of the Quran, perhaps both. It is for this reason that these suras get the name aji, though some will have it that this name is given to them because each begins with Ji. It is interesting to note that in Sura 113 we read of B--- 5--c----s ti the magic knot Asc plural of Ins.. SoU and hf are used interchangeably with Wys. The next word to note in this connection is which has been wrongly identified with fjc. This last consists, as has been seen, of an amulet with a Quran inscription. on the other hand, is a black bead speckled with white, though there is room for doubt as to its exact shape. Freytag, however, followed by Wellhausen,3 says it is a necklace and not a bead, as Lane maintains. Besides differing in form from its use was forbidden by Mohammed, while the former was allowed. A connection is suggested by Freytag with the D'Qrf worn by the high priest, Deut. xxxiii. 8, etc. Later Jewish scholars think that this has some connection with magic. Gildemeister considers to be a mere transcription of the Greek Telesma (r&tojua), whence the English 1 See Wellh. Reste, 161, note 3. J lb., p. 165, note 4. 3 Wellh. Reste, p. 166. "talisman." The usual explanation of the word is that it comes from (to be complete), because it was believed to keep the person whole or healthy. The tamima was worn by women and children only. As the boy grew up to manhood this amulet was taken from his neck. Though Islam disowns the name, this kind of amulet is still to be seen worn by the Meccan boys. Sjw (strictly what hinders, keeps off) is used to describe an amulet which was kept in a case called-- c. and suspended on the right side by a string passing over the left...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 42 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236529790
  • 9781236529794