Madrid in 1835; Sketches of the Metropolis of Spain and Its Inhabitants, and of Society and Manners in the Peninsula Volume 2

Madrid in 1835; Sketches of the Metropolis of Spain and Its Inhabitants, and of Society and Manners in the Peninsula Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1836 edition. Excerpt: ...a Spaniard. Signs of the times are threatening; he flatters himself that the day is at last arrived when his thirst of vengeance may be satisfied: the revolution breaks forth--the churc h lands are to be sold!--how grateful such a purchase to a mortal enemy!--he makes a last sacrifice, and becomes proprietor of monkish acres. The old system is not long abolished, however; and its re-establishment brings back his old friends, reclaiming their property. By them he is treated as a pilfering slave; they ruin him, for the rest of his days by a peculiar method of exacting damages and arrears, and bid him thank God that the church is merciful and a hater of blood, otherwise his would be forfeited for such a sacrilege. His place is taken from him, --he is "impurified," with the wide world left him for a home, and despair and misery to make it comfortable. Once under this ban, nothing avails him; he becomes a paria in his own country--a mark is set upon him. " Let him live, but not hope!" The insolent exactions of the monks, after the fall of the short-lived constitution, are past all credence. They not only obliged the unlucky purchasers to restore the property, without any sort of compensation, but made them pay the " damage' done to their premises. The following is an instance of this mode of dealing: --A citizen of Madrid purchased a lot of ruined hovels and waste ground at the corner of the Calle del Desengano, which had belonged to one of the monasteries. He expended several thousand dollars in the VOL. II. O Don Augustin an old friend of mine, was a sad instance of the truth of what has been said. Forced, like every other public servant, to swear to the constitution, in the year 1820, he was afterwards made prefect (or gefe...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 80 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 159g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236632109
  • 9781236632104