Machinery's Encyclopedia; A Work of Reference Covering Practical Mathematics and Mechanics, Machine Design, Machine Construction and Operation, Electrical, Gas, Hydraulic, and Steam Power Machinery, Metallurgy, and Kindred Volume 2

Machinery's Encyclopedia; A Work of Reference Covering Practical Mathematics and Mechanics, Machine Design, Machine Construction and Operation, Electrical, Gas, Hydraulic, and Steam Power Machinery, Metallurgy, and Kindred Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: ...content and usually high-class quality. 2. Hot-blast irons, produced with the blast preheated, with a reduction of silica in the blast furnace and consequent high silicon content in the pig iron. 3. Hematite, made from pure ores and exceptionally low in sulphur and phosphorus contents, with marked strength and toughness. Grading is usually determined by fracture and based upon the closeness of the grain, which is govemed largely by the size of the graphite flakes. The numbers range from 1 to 6, N0. I being the most open. Nos. I to 4 are typical foundry pig irons. These grade numbers are not always used, however, as some firms adopt their own classification. Moreover, pig iron of the same grade and number, and from the same source of supply, varies considerably in different deliveries. Changes that Occur while Melting.--In determining the mixture, the efiects of the various elements in cast iron must be considered. Silicon should be taken as the base for working, as it appears to affect to the greatest degree the resulting physical properties, whereas manganese, phosphorus, and sulphur require to be regulated according to the particular class of work under consideration. When the charge in the cupola is melting, changes occur in the content of the elements and these must be allowed for in calculating the mixtures. For instance, the silicon is reduced 0.20 to 0.25 per cent and, therefore, the mixture should contain the amount of silicon desired, plus the amount bumed out during melting. The sulphur of the mixture should be about 0.01 per cent lower as the amount is always increased slightly, depending upon the content of sulphur in the coke and the quality of the slag. The amount of phosphorus remains practically unchanged, whereas...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 462 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 24mm | 816g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236899423
  • 9781236899422